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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 744 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 56 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 40 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 37 3 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 37 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 5 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Introduction (search)
e aroused, and in his senior year his true abilities asserted themselves. For in that year he received the highest marks in the class, and graduated fourth. After leaving college, he turned his attention to Natural History, and worked under Louis Agassiz. Devoting himself to the study of Ophiurans while maintaining a broad interest in the outside world, Lyman became the authority of his day on that group. In 1858 he married Elizabeth Russell, daughter of George R. Russell, an East India mhere they lived some two years, before starting to travel in Europe. There a daughter was born, and there they remained until she was old enough to be brought safely home. In the winter of 1856, the year after he graduated, Lyman was sent by Agassiz on a scientific pilgrimage to Florida waters. In Key West he ran across Captain George Gordon Meade of the Engineers, who was superintending the construction of lighthouses in that district. In those days a traveller was a rara avis in Florida
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
I. First months Theodore Lyman reached Boston early in June 1863, hoping to obtain a Staff appointment. His first weeks were spent in settling his little family in Brookline, adjusting his private affairs, and sorting the collections of his beloved Ophiurans that had accumulated during his absence in Louis Agassiz's newly built museum. Many of Lyman's friends thought that his desire to join the army was quixotic and unnecessary. Meanwhile Lee's advanced guard had crossed the upper Potomac, and Hooker had moved on Centreville from Falmouth. There will be stirring times ahead, writes Lyman in his journal. Every one takes the matter with great calmness; we are too dead! Soon came Gettysburg; and shortly afterward Mrs. Lyman's cousin, Robert Shaw, fell at the head of his negro regiment in the assault of Fort Wagner. Again Lyman writes: Bob was a shining example of great development of character under pressing circumstances. In peace times he would have lived and died a quie
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
as not so charming as it looked. There had been a heavy cavalry skirmish in the woods and they were full of dead horses, which, as the evening closed, became, as Agassiz would say, highly offensive. It was positively frightful! and there I waited till eleven at night! Not even the novelty of the position was enough to distract ig wells, whence healthy water may be got. One well near this was productive of scientific results, as they got from it a quantity of shells which I shall send to Agassiz. All this country is underlain more or less by marl beds, which are old sea-bottoms full of a good many different shells. The good Colonel de Chanal took a rideilians and a lean one. Fat number one was Mr. Otto, Assistant Secretary of the Interior; Fat number two, a Professor Matile, a Swiss of Neufchatel, and friend of Agassiz (you perhaps remember the delicious wine of that place). The lean was Mr. Falls, what I should call Mr. Otto's striker, that being the name of an officer's servan
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
Index Abbot, Henry Livermore, 76, 318, 332; death, 95, 97. Adams, Charles Francis, Jr., 104. Agassiz, Louis, III. Aide-de-camp, qualities of, 121. Aiken house, 219, 220. Alden, Algernon Sidney, 257, 289. Alexandria, Va., 4. Anderson, —, 265. Anderson house, 115, 128. Annoy, use of word, 247. Appleton, Nathan, 72, 127, 169. Appomattox campaign, 803; High Bridge, 352. Armistice, 154, 170, 201. Armstrong house, 114. Army, on the march, 29, 55; reinforcing, 31, 177; intercourse with enemy, 106, 153, 181; formation of, 263. Assaults, effect of too many, 148n. Atlanta, capture of, 228. Atlanta, iron-clad, 161, 163. Avery, Martin P., 171. Ayres, Romeyn Beck, 234, 236, 242, 331. Babcock, Orville Elias, 161, 314. Bache, —, 204. Badajos, English at, 207. Badeau, Adam, 314. Baldwin, Briscoe G., 125. Barlow, Francis Channing, 109, 117, 135,157, 215, 216; described, 107, 158, 189; at Cold Harbor, 144; at Petersburg, 186. Barnard, Daniel P., 34
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Alexander, 1835- (search)
Agassiz, Alexander, 1835- Naturalist; born in Neuchatel, Switzerland, Dec. 17, 1835: son of Prof. Louis Agassiz; came to the United States in 1849; and was graduated at Harvard College in 1855, and at Lawrence Scientific School in 1857. He was curator of the Natural History Museum, in Cambridge, in 1874-85: has since been engaged in important zoological investigations; and became widely known by his connection with the famous Calumet and Hecla copper-mines. The University of St. Andrews conferred the honorary degree of Ll.D. upon him, April 2, 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot, 1823- (search)
Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot, 1823- Naturalist and educator; born in Boston, Mass., in 1823; daughter of Thomas G. Cary; was married to Prof. Louis Agassiz in 1850. In 1865 she accompanied her husband on his expedition to Brazil, and in 1871-72 was on the Hassler expedition. She greatly aided her husband in his studies and writings: was joint author with her son of Seaside studies in natural history; published Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence; and was president of the Harvard Annex, Mass., in 1823; daughter of Thomas G. Cary; was married to Prof. Louis Agassiz in 1850. In 1865 she accompanied her husband on his expedition to Brazil, and in 1871-72 was on the Hassler expedition. She greatly aided her husband in his studies and writings: was joint author with her son of Seaside studies in natural history; published Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence; and was president of the Harvard Annex, now Radcliffe College, from its organization till 1899, when she resigned.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 (search)
eat work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. ters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the y scientific societies, and the universities of Dublin and Ediniburgh conferred on him the honorary degree of Ll.D. Professor Agassiz published valuable scientific works in Europe and in the United States. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 14, 1873
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bickmore, Albert Smith, 1839- (search)
Bickmore, Albert Smith, 1839- Educator; born in St. George, Me., March 1, 1839: graduated at Dartmouth College in 1860, and studied under Professor Agassiz at the Lawrence Scientific School in Cambridge, Mass. In 1865-69 he travelled in the Malay Archipelago and in eastern Asia. Returning, he was appointed Professor of Natural History at Madison University. In 1885 he became professor in charge of the Department of Public Instruction in the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He is the author of Travels in the East Indian Archipclago; The Ainos, or Hairy men of Jesso; Sketch of a journey from Canton to Bangkok, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Guyot, Arnold Henry 1807-1884 (search)
Guyot, Arnold Henry 1807-1884 Geologist; born in Bondevilliers, Neuchatel, Switzerland, Sept. 28, 1807; was educated at the College of Neuchatel. In 1838 he made examinations of the Swiss glaciers, at the request of Prof. Louis Agassiz (q. v.), and sent his results to the Geological Society of France. It was in these examinations that he discovered the laminated structure of ice in the glaciers. In 1839-48 he was Professor of History and Physical Geography at the academy in Neuchatel. this work the Vienna Exposition of 1873 awarded him a medal. In 1873-77 he edited Johnson's New universal Cyclopaedia (with Frederick A. P. Barnard), and was the author of many articles in it on physical geography and like subjects. His publications include biographies of Carl Ritter, James H. Coffin, and Louis Agassiz; A treatise on physical geography; Creation, or the Biblical cosmogony in the light of modern Sciences; and also numerous lectures. He died in Princeton, N. J., Feb. 8, 1884.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Le Conte, Joseph 1823- (search)
Le Conte, Joseph 1823- Geologist; born in Liberty county, Ga., Feb. 26, 1823; graduated at the University of Georgia, in 1841, and later at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City; settled in Macon, Ga., to practise medicine; studied at the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard in 1850-51; and in the latter year went with Agassiz to Florida on an exploring expedition. He was appointed Professor of Natural Science in Oglethorpe College in 1852, and in the following year became Professor of Geology and Natural History in the University of Georgia. During 1857-69 he was Professor of Chemistry and Geology in the College of South Carolina. In 1862-63 he was a chemist in the Confederate laboratory for the manufacture of medicines, and in 1864-65 held a similar post in the nitre and mining bureau. In 1869 he was called to the chair of Natural History and Geology in the University of California. Professor Le Conte is the author of Religion and Science; Elements of Geo
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