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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 744 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 56 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 40 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 37 3 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 37 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 5 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 14 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Louis Agassiz or search for Louis Agassiz in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 8 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
be long before I shall have corrected it and prepared it for the hands of the printer; a task I cannot find it in my heart to hurry, so agreeable is it to me. Agassiz continues to flourish, and enjoys the same sort of popular favor he has from the first. Professor Louis Agassiz came to Boston in the year 1846, and immediatelProfessor Louis Agassiz came to Boston in the year 1846, and immediately became a much-loved guest, and friend, at Mr. Ticknor's house. The friendship was uniform and full of warmth on both sides; and while the pursuits of the two men, their national peculiarities, and their modes of viewing many subjects, were very different, they took great pleasure in each other's society. Mr. Agassiz took counseMr. Agassiz took counsel of Mr. Ticknor many times, saying that the working of the Anglo-Saxon mind was full of valuable instruction for him; while the practical wisdom of his friend, individually, assisted him in settling questions, the solution of which did not lie in his department as a man of science. His bonhomie seems inexhaustible; and how much th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
ill go, I will do more for the Library at home than I have hitherto done, in order that your absence may be less severely felt. While this question remained unsettled, no time was lost with regard to Mr. Bates's new donations. Mr. Ticknor immediately began personally to collect, from men distinguished in special departments, lists of works on their several subjects, which ought to be on the shelves of a great library, thus getting contributions of much consequence from such men as Professors Agassiz, Bond, Cooke, Felton, Hayward, Holmes, Lovering, Pierce, and Dr. John Ware; from Professor W. B. Rogers and Judge Curtis; from Colonel Thayer of the Army and Captain Goldsborough of the Navy; from engineers and architects, clergymen and men of letters. With these, and with all the bibliographical resources they could command, Mr. Ticknor and Mr. Jewett worked, in Mr. Ticknor's library, for more than two months, Mr. Jewett remaining there eight hours a day, preparing the lists that wer
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
General Sabine writes me that the English translation is finished and will appear immediately. The same news comes to me from France, from M. Galuzzi, who has been passing the winter in the south, at Cannes. The great and beautiful work of Agassiz (the first two volumes) reached me only a few days since. It will produce a great effect by the breadth of its general views, and by the extreme sagacity of its special embryological observations. I never believed that this illustrious man, wh May 9. I was still more gratified. Indeed, I cannot tell you how much I was gratified by it. It contained such excellent news of yourself; it was so flattering to me that you should write to me at all. You are quite right in supposing that Agassiz will remain in the United States. In fact, he has never doubted. He is happily married. His social position is as agreeable as we can make it. His pecuniary resources are quite sufficient for his wants. The field for his peculiar labors is n
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
d death, which are, I conceive, the natural results of the prevalence of military governments. So I will tell you about Agassiz and his affairs. . . . . The establishment The Museum of Comparative Zoology at Cambridge. is a grand one, and I takethat had intervened, his expectations had been realized in some degree. I know almost nothing of the science he [Professor Agassiz] has illustrated, by labors and sacrifices, which I cannot find elsewhere among us. But this we all know. The diffg about in Cambridge, Charlestown, and Boston, seven or eight hours,—one of which, or nearly one, was spent with him and Agassiz, alone in Agassiz's Museum, and of which I must give you an account when I see you. It was one of the remarkable hours oAgassiz's Museum, and of which I must give you an account when I see you. It was one of the remarkable hours of my life. To Sir Edmund Head, Bart. Boston, April 8, 1861. My dear Head,—We are all asleep here, and have been for some time, personally and politically. . . . All North--the old Union —is asleep, but is not therefore doing well. In my judg<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
ght to be, considering that a more ignorant man in regard to natural science can hardly be found; but Dr. Bigelow, who is in deeper than I am, is safe, and he and Agassiz will be held responsible for any mistakes I may make. At least, I intend they shall be. . . . . Anna writes, as usual, so that nothing remains for me but to gmade up of his personal friends, and of men whose conversation rendered their meetings interesting and stimulating. The original members of this club were Professor Agassiz, Mr. W. Amory, Mr. Sidney Bartlett, Hon. B. R. Curtis, Mr. C. C. Felton, Mr. W. W. Greenough, Mr. G. S. Hillard, Mr. R. M. Mason, Professor W. B. Rogers, Mr.e resigned on the ground of age. Mr. Ticknor's duties and interests in connection with the Zoological Museum at Cambridge, to which, for the sake of his friend Agassiz, he sincerely devoted himself, and the relations he still held to the Public Library, occupied him in congenial ways, but even here the excitements of the war int
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
to G. T. Curtis, Sir C. Lyell, Sir E. Head, R. H. Gardiner, friend B. B. Wiffen, General Thayer, C. F. Bradford, Professor Louis Agassiz, Lady Cranworth. death of Mr. Everett. During the period of old age, upon which Mr. Ticknor had now entered,fy, knocking away the very foundations on which you build. But quien sabe? The context, if there is one, might show. Agassiz is having his own way in Brazil as much as he ever had here. The Emperor does everything for him that he wants, gives hr clear commission sees: Yet with an equal joy let me behold Thy chariot o'er that way by others roll'd I To Professor Louis Agassiz. Boston, U. S. A., January 14, 1866. my dear Agassiz,—You have written me three interesting and important leAgassiz,—You have written me three interesting and important letters from Brazil, and I have answered neither of them, partly from good reasons, partly from poor; neither worth remembering now. But I think I have done exactly what you meant I should do; I have used them in every way I could for the benefit of t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
ve-and-twenty years ago. Strutt was senior wrangler at Cambridge a few years since; Morley was about as high at Oxford; and Cowper, Hollond, and Camperdown were evidently men who stood, or meant to stand, on the intellectual qualities . . . . Agassiz and his wife are just about to publish a book—only one volume—on Brazil. You must read it, for it is full of matter, very pleasantly presented. We have just finished it, in what they call an advance copy, and the two Annas have enjoyed it as much as I have. Lady Head, I am sure, will like it. But you know how fond we are of Agassiz, and perhaps we like the book overmuch, especially as we have been reading it in an advance copy, as such things are called, and so have had nobody to moderate our opinion. We are all well, grandchildren and all; and all who have ever seen you and yours send you affectionate regards. Ever yours, Geo. Ticknor To Hon. Edward Twisleton. Boston, March 22, 1868. my dear Twisleton,—Your sad let<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
ord), II. 873 and note, 374, 396, 397. Adair, Right Hon. Sir Robert, I. 269. Adams, Hon., Charles Francis, I. 459, II. 493. Adams, John, President U. S., I. 12, 13, 30, 330, 339, II. 408; death of, I. 377; eulogy on, by Webster, 378. Adams, John Quincy, President U. S., I. 12, 49, 54, 339, 349, 409, 459. Adams, Mrs., John, I. 13. Adams, Mrs., John Quincy, I. 349. Adderley, Right Hon. Charles, II. 358, 363, 419. Addington, Mr., I. 350, 411. Adelaide, Madame, II. 121. Agassiz, Louis, I. 421 and note, II. 231 and note, 310, 412, 414, 422, 423, 432, 438, 445 and note, 471, 482; letter to, 472. Aiken, Charles, I. 416. Alba, Count da, I. 248, 249. Albani, Cardinal, I. 181. Albany, Countess of, I. 183, 184, II. 57. Albemarle, Earl of, II 149, 150. Alberi, Professor, Eugenio, II. 315. Albert, Prince, Consort, II. 429. Alberti, Count, Tasso Mss., II. 52, 53, 78, 79 and note. Aldobrandini, Princess, I. 256 and note. See Borghese, Princess. Alertz,