hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 744 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 56 0 Browse Search
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 40 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 37 3 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 37 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 5 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for Louis Agassiz or search for Louis Agassiz in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XVI (search)
the science of the age it is that plot is everything. Museums were formerly collections of detached specimens, only classified for convenience under a few half-arbitrary divisions. One may still see such collections surviving, for instance, in that melancholy hall through which people pass, as rapidly as possible, to reach the modern theatre known as the Boston Museum. But in all natural history museums of any pretensions, the individual specimen is subordinated to the whole. The great Agassiz collection at Harvard is expressly named The Museum of Comparative Zoology. In the Peabody Museum at Yale—in which, as Charles Darwin told me, quoting Huxley, there is more to be learned than from all the museums of Europe—you are not shown the skeleton of a horse, and left with that knowledge, but you are shown every step in the development of the horse from the time when, in pre-historic periods, he was no larger than a fox and had five toes. In science, plot is not only not ignored, bu
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
Index A. About, Edmond, 82. Addison, Joseph, 119, 196. Aeschylus, 16, 99, 171. Agassiz, Louis, 177. Ainsworth, W. H., 94. Albert, Prince, 28. Albion newspaper, the, 64. Aldrich, T. B., 67, 102. Alford, Henry, 57, 94. American, an, evolution of, 221. American Civil War, literary influence of, 65. American press, as viewed by Irving, 2. Americanism, English standard of, 20. Andersen, H. C., 214. Anglomania, origin of, 64. Anti-slavery agitation, literary influence of, 66. Apologies, unnecessary, 120. Archer, the jockey, 205. Ariosto, Lodovico, 187. Aristophanes, 99, 229. Aristotle, 174, 232. Arnold, Sir, Edwin, 106, 110. Arnold, Matthew, 3, 5, 19, 20, 21, 22, 35, 38, 46, 91, 123, 195, 206, 208. Austen, Jane, 10, 15, 219, 229. Austin, Henry, 101. Austin, Sarah, 144. B. Background, the need of a, 113. Bacon, Lord, 114, 175. Bailey, P. J., 57. Bain, Alexander, 202. Balzac, H. de, 114. Bancroft, George, 107, 155. Bancr