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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
he Ninth Georgia regiment. It was then reorganized. Jackson's brigade was formed of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Twenty-seventh Virginia regiments, and Pendleton's battery; Bee's of the Second and Eleventh Mississippi, Fourth Alabama, and Second Tennessee regiments, and Imboden's battery; Elzey's of the Tenth and Thirteenth Virginia, Third Tennessee and Maryland regiments, and Groves's battery; and Bartow's of the Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Georgia regiments, the Kentucky Battalion, and Alburtis's battery. As the intelligence obtained from Maryland indicated that General Patterson was preparing to cross the Potomac again, Colonel Jackson was sent with his brigade to the vicinity of Martinsburg to support the cavalry. He was instructed also to protect and aid an agent of the Government, appointed for the work, in removing such of the rolling-stock of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad as he might select for the use of the Confederacy, or as much of it as practicable. It was to be
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
of our line, we were now compelled to fight on the defensive, a mile and a half behind that line, and at right angles to it, on a new and unsurveyed field, with no other plans than those suggested by the changing events of battle. As soon as the necessary orders had been dispatched, I set out at a rapid gallop, accompanied by General Beauregard, to give such aid as we could to our troops engaged four miles off. Passing Colonel Pendleton, chief of artillery, with his former battery and Alburtis's, I desired him to follow with them as fast as possible. We came upon the field not a moment too soon. The long contest against great odds, and the heavy losses, especially of field-officers, had discouraged Bee's troops, and destroyed or dispersed those of Evans — for we found him apparently without a command. The Fourth Alabama Regiment, of Bee's brigade, had lost all its field-officers, and was without a commander. Colonel S. R. Gist,Distinguished in the Army of Tennessee, as bri
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
of the attack. The order to advance will be given by the commander-in-chief. 6th. Brigadier-General Bee's brigade, supported by Colonel Wilcox's brigade, Colonel Stuart's regiment of cavalry, and the whole of Walton's battery, will form the reserve, and will march via Mitchell's Ford, to be used according to circumstances. 7th. The light batteries will be distributed as follows: (1.) To General Ewell's command; Captain Walker's, six pieces. (2.) To Brigadier-General Jones; Captains Alburtis's and Stannard's batteries, eight pieces. (3.) To Brigadier-General Longstreet's; Colonel Pendleton's and Captain Imboden's batteries, eight pieces. (4.) To Brigadier-General Bonham's; Captains Kemper's and Shields's batteries, eight pieces. (5.) To Colonels Cocke and Hunton; Captains Latham's and Beckham's batteries, twelve pieces. 8th. Colonel Radford, commanding cavalry, will detail to report immediately as follows: To General Ewell, two companies of cavalry. To