Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for E. P. Alexander or search for E. P. Alexander in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 9 document sections:

nia cavalry, followed in close pursuit to Briar Creek, a distance of eight miles from the point from where the first attack was made. After burning the bridges above and below, the railroad bridges as well as the latter, the command marched to Alexander and encamped for the night. In this engagement, Wheeler's cavalry corps, consisting of four (4) divisions and two independent brigades, it has since been ascertained, was not only defeated and driven a distance of eight miles, but completely r separate report accompanying this. Judging from the enemy's killed and wounded left on the field, his loss must have been severe; upward of two hundred (200) left in our hands were wounded by the sabre alone. December 5. We marched from Alexander to Jacksonboro, covering the rear of the Fourteenth army corps. December 6. The First brigade (Colonel Murray) marched to Springfield, moving in rear of the Twentieth army corps. The Second brigade (Colonel Atkins) moved to Hudson Ferry.
eman,) the right. The advance was sounded, and in less than twenty minutes the enemy was driven from his position, the town gained, and Wheeler's entire force completely routed. The Fifth Ohio, Fifth Kentucky, and a portion of the Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, followed in close pursuit to Briar Creek, a distance of eight miles from the point from where the first attack was made. After burning the bridges above and below, the railroad bridges as well as the latter, the command marched to Alexander and encamped for the night. In this engagement, Wheeler's cavalry corps, consisting of four (4) divisions and two independent brigades, it has since been ascertained, was not only defeated and driven a distance of eight miles, but completely routed. The men of my command fought most bravely throughout the day, and it is impossible to single out, from among the officers, individual cases of gallantry, when all did so well. My casualties on this day, as well as all others, will be found
December 5. We marched from Alexander to Jacksonboro, covering the rear of the Fourteenth army corps.
, and the division marched to the farm of Mr. Gisholm, and went into camp. December third, arrived at Thomas Station on the Savannah and Augusta road, and during the night thoroughly destroyed several miles of railroad track. December fourth, General Kilpatrick attacked the enemy's cavalry one mile from Thomas Station, and drove them in confusion through Waynesboro and two miles beyond. Division followed up and supported General Kilpatrick during the day and then made a night march to Alexander. December fifth, reached Jacksonboro. December sixth, arrived at Beaver Dam Creek and joined the other two divisions of the corps. December seventh, late at night, reached Sisters Ferry. December eighth, remained in camp during the day and had considerable skirmishing with the advance of the enemy's cavalry; marched at midnight and crossed Ebenezer Creek at three A. M., December ninth. December tenth, encamped within twelve miles of Savannah, making short marches. Division encamped,
each, and cheering on the men. The Fifth Ohio volunteer cavalry, Colonel T. T. Heath, followed the enemy to Brier Creek, on the Augusta road, and completely destroyed the large railroad bridge over that creek. My brigade moved that night to Alexander, and encamped. 5th. Marched twenty-two (22) miles, and encomped at Jacksonboro. 6th. Marched fourteen (14) miles, covering rear of Fourteenth army corps, and encamped at Buck Creek. 7th. Marched at eight A. M., the enemy attacking o wounded. Adjutant William C. Cook, who, in the charge, dashed upon the enemy's banner and attempted to carry it off, was knocked from his horse, and had his horse shot, and still remains in the enemy's hands. We then moved from Waynesboro to Alexander, and encamped. 5th. Marched all day, and went into camp at Brier Creek. 6th. Marched to within three (3) miles of Savannah River, and encamped. 7th. Marched all day, the rebels in our rear. About four P. M., they attempted to cut u
Chief of Artillery; Lieutenant-Colonel Corley, Chief Quartermaster; Lieutenant-Colonel Cole, Chief Commissary; Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander, Chief of Ordnance; Surgeon Guild, Medical Director; Colonel Lay and Lieutenant-Colonel Harvie, Inspectors-Genied under the direction of Brigadier-General Pendleton, Chief of Artillery, Colonel Cabell of McLaws's division, Colonel E. P. Alexander and Captain S. R. Johnson of the engineers. To prevent gunboats from ascending the river a battery, protected best of Marye's hill, and those on the heights to the right and left, were held by part of the reserve artillery, Colonel E. P. Alexander's battalion, and the division batteries of Anderson, Ransom, and McLaws. A. P. Hill, of Jackson's corps, was poand contributed much to the repulse of the enemy, having exhausted its ammunition, was relieved about four P. M. by Colonel Alexander's battalion. The latter occupied the position during the rest of the engagement, and by its well-directed fire, re
command which had joined them, were under the direction of my Adjutant, Captain Dubose, and Major Alexander, and my Aid, Captain Troup. They had formed, in part, on the road to the left of the plate and this command, under Colonel Bute and Colonel Holmes, accompanied by Captain Dubose and Major Alexander, my Quartermaster, who acted as one of my Aids on the field, advanced with General Kershaw' was poured into them from the left flank, and they retreated in disorder. Captain Dubose, Major Alexander, and Captain Troup, of my staff, were on this part of the road, and used their best exertioegiment was formed in line of battle across the road where the first prisoner was taken by Captain Alexander's company. It was here that we received a few shots from the enemy's pickets, which retretain Saunders, Captain Rice, Captain Roy, Captain Jett, Captain Healy, Captain Lawson, and Captain Alexander, and Lieutenants Brockenbrough, Roane, Reynolds, Davis, Healy, and Street; particularly Ca
ted rapidly and in great confusion. Being on the extreme left of the brigade, we were the first to see the flank movement of the enemy, and by the rapid retreat were prevented from being surrounded. All the officers of the battalion strove most gallantly to hold the men to their position, and made the most heroic endeavors to rally them after they had broken. Failing in this, some of the officers and men joined in with the reserves, and took part in their successful advance. Second Lieutenant Alexander, company A, was disabled by a severe wound in the left thigh, about the time the battalion gave way. It may be proper to add that Lieutenant White, acting Aid-de-camp to Colonel Garnett, informed me, just as the enemy advanced from the woods, that the Tenth Virginia regiment occupied our left. Accompanying this you will please find a list of casualties. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John Seddon, Major, commanding First Virginia Battalion. Report of Lieutenant-Col
f General Mower, of the Sixteenth, and General T. Kilby Smith of the Seventeenth corps, to infuse into the different corps that unity of spirit which is as essential to victory as the valor of the soldiers in actual battle. I gladly accord to the men of their commands the honor of having fought a desperate enemy, superior in numbers, with as much gallantry and success as that which distinguished the troops of my immediate command. No higher praise than this can be given to any soldiers. Alexander's troops never fought better. The results of the position of the cavalry train, and the loose order of march by the leading column of troops under Major-General Franklin, on the eighth of April, before the battle of Sabine Cross-Roads, have been stated. A commanding officer is of course responsible for all that occurs to his command, whatever may have been the cause. I do not shrink from that responsibility. But while it was both proper and necessary for me to give personal attention