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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
frey, Miss Sarah H., 16. Parker, Rev., Theodore, 53, 58, 62, 63, 67, 104, 179, 180, 181. Parsons, Charles, 77. Parsons, T. W., 67. Paul, Jean, (see Richter). Peirce, Benjamin, 16. Peirce, Prof., Benjamin, 143. Peirce, C. S., 16. Peirce, J. M., 16. Percival, J. G., 175, 191. Perry, T. S., 70. Petrarch, Francis, 191. Phelps, E. J., 195. Phillips, M. D., 68. Phillips, Wendell, 104, 179. Phillips, Willard, 44. Pierce, Pres., Franklin, 113. Poe, E. A., 137, 144, 173. Pope, Alexander, 90, 91. Popkin, Dr. J. S., 23. Potter, Barrett, 119. Pratt, Dexter, 126. Pratt, Rowena, 126. Putnam, Rev., George, 54, Putnam, Mrs. S. R., 16. Puttenham, George, 159. Quincy, Edmund, 67, 104. Quincy, Pres., Josiah, 29, 43, 157. Read, Gen., Meredith, 132. Richter, J. P. F., 85, 116. Riedesel, Baroness, 149, 150. Ripley, George, 48, 54,57, 67, 113. Rossetti, D. G., 132. Rousseau, J. J., 191. Ruggles, Mrs., 151. Ruggles, Capt., George, 150. Russell, Miss P., 75. Sackvil
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 14: Jesuits' pupils. (search)
s heard of his son's return to Santa Clara, he leaped, with all a Mexican's jealousy of priests, to the conclusion that Alexander was falling into a Jesuit snare. Driving to the college, he demanded leave to see his son: rules or no rules, he would see his son; and pushing past the porters, he strode into Alexander's room. What are you doing here? Doing here, father? Reading for the bar. You are a scoundrel, sir! You are deceiving me; deceiving me, your father! You are enteringd gentleman drove him home, and then locking his door, put the case before him briefly and hotly: Take your choice, Alexander; go into an attorney's office at San Jose and learn your trade like a clerk; or go to Yale and study it like a gentleman. To which will you go? Speak, Sir; San Jose or Yale. To Yale, cried Alexander; and to Yale he went. It was a new world to me, he says; each man in that great university was free to go his own way, to labour as he pleased. to form a ch
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
a. W. F. Gardiner Hunton's Brigade. Eighth Virginia. T. A. Ware; Geo. W. Harris. Eighteenth Virginia. J. D. Blackwell. Nineteenth Virginia. P. Slaughter. Twenty-eighth Virginia. Rev. Mr. Tinsley. Fifty-sixth Virginia. Rev. Mr. Robbins. Corse's Brigade. Fifteenth Virginia. P. F. August. Seventeenth Virginia. John L. Johnson; R. M. Baker. Thirtieth Virginia. W. R. D. Moncure. Thirty-second Virginia. Twenty-ninth Virginia. Rev. Mr. Phillippi. Artillery first Corps (Brigadier-General Alexander). Haskell's Battalion. J. A. Chambliss. Gibbes' Virginia Battalion. Cabell's Virginia Battalion. Huger's Virginia Battalion. Washington Artillery Battalion. Wm. A. Hall. Missionary Chaplains in the Corps: Rev. Dr. Theodorick Pryor; Rev. Dr. J. C. Granberry; Rev. Harvie Hatcher; Rev. A. B. Woodfin. Second Corps (Major-General John B. Gordon commanding). Chaplains-at-large: Rev. Dr. B. T. Lacy; Rev. Dr. L. Rosser; Rev. E. J. Willis. Gordon's Division. Ev
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Index. (search)
fourth visit to England, 390-391; champions cause of Southern negroes, 391; champions cause of Chinese, 392; believes in Free Trade, 392-393; illness and death, 393-395. Garrison, William Lloyd, Jr., 297. Gazette, Boston, 217. Genius of Universal Emancipation, 58, 69, 71-75. Gibbons, James S., 309. Giddings, Joshua R., 338. Goodell, William, 149, 203, 247, 248. Green, William, Jr., 184. Grimke, Angelina E., 235, 258-259. Grimke, Sisters, 275-280. Hale, John P., 338, 350. Hamilton, Alexander, 1004. Hamlin, Hannibal, 338. Haydon, Benjamin Robert, 294, 295. Hayne, Robert Y., 209. Herald, Newburyport, 21, 26. Herald, New York, 340, 341. Higginson, T. W., 358-359, 361. Hoar, Samuel, 314. Horton, Jacob, 61. Hovey, Charles F., 389. Jackson, Francis, 233, 240-241, 311-312, 317, 341, 344. Jewett, Daniel E., 175. Jocelyn, Rev. Simeon Smith, 203. Johnson, Andrew, 380. Johnson, Oliver, 114, 134, 137, 139, 16o-16I, 374. journal, Camden (S. C.), 128. Journal, Louisville (Ky.),
Chapter 2: subjects of the revival. There is a strongly marked difference between armies of invasion and armies of defence. The former are often mere bands of butchers following at the heels of some ambitious leader. But when men fight for country, kindred, and home, they bear a moral character that lifts them above mercenary motives. Soldiers may fight bravely for glory, or for gain. We should not underrate the valor of the men that bore the standards of Alexander, Caesar, and Napoleon, to so many victories; but take from such soldiers the esprit du corps, and you have left no pure and high inspiration which makes it sweet to die for one's country. In our war the Northern people fought, as they declared, to maintain the Union as it came from the hands of the fathers; the Southern people fought for the right of self-government. The war was brought to our doors, and was waged against us with the most determined and relentless spirit. Our people were thoroughly aroused,
nemy was crossing troops over his bridges at Fredericksburg, and massing them in front of Longstreet's line. Soon after his repulse on our right, he commenced a series of attacks on our left, with d view of obtaining possession of the heights immediately overlooking the town. These repeated attacks were repulsed in gallant style by the Washington Artillery, under Col. Walton, and a portion of McLaw's Division, which occupied those heights. The last assault was made after dark, when Col. Alexander's battalion had relieved the Washington Artillery (whose ammunition had been exhausted), and ended the contest for the day. The enemy was supported in his attack by the fire of strong batteries of artillery on the right bank of the river, as well as by the numerous heavy batteries on the Stafford Heights. Our loss, during the operations, since the movements of the enemy began, amounts to about eighteen hundred killed and wounded. Among the former I regret to report the death of the pa
efore the door. The heavy bolts were shot back, and in the doorway stood Cap-Alexander, the officer in charge. The little clock that ticked upon the wall noted abefore that. It is the order of General Winder, and I must obey, answered Alexander. You must prepare yourself at once. Without another word Webster arose fr I will be brave, and die like a man. Farewell, forever! then turning to Captain Alexander, who stood unmoved near the door, he said: I am ready! As they ad done its worst, and the loyal spy was dead. Early in the afternoon, Captain Alexander returned to the prison, and informed Mrs. Lawton that all was over. He fofficers stood around the coffin. Turning suddenly upon them, and facing Captain Alexander, Mrs. Lawton, in a burst of passion, exclaimed: Murderers! this is l feel it before you die! As if stung to the quick by this accusation, Captain Alexander stepped up to the coffin, and laying his hand upon Webster's cold, white
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 10: General Banks's orders and responsibility. (search)
obrium. They were consequently in no mood to discuss discretionary forms or prudential suggestions; and upon the first explicit order to attack, they burst upon the foe with a valor so splendid and devoted that cavilling criticism is silenced in admiration, and history will mark the day of Cedar Mountain as one of the proudest upon her illustrious record. In Banks's words to the committee, Our troops never fought better; they had been retreating up to that time, and panted for a fight. Alexander's troops never fought better. In these lines, all but praise for the fighting is balderdash and nonsense. But one of the five brigades constituting Banks's corps at Cedar Mountain, and a part of another, composed the force that fought against the overwhelming numbers of the enemy in the valley of the Shenandoah. Our conduct in that fight everywhere met, as it merited, public approbation. The troops, therefore, that were with Banks did not burn to wipe away unmerited opprobrium. But
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
clipsed, in the culture of its upper classes, the refinement of European courts, and matched them in the arts of war and peace, but has boldly struck the shackles of slavery from the limbs of as many million men as now make up the population of all our old Free States. I cannot resist the desire here to link Bayard Taylor's grandest poem with this portion of our historic chain. A thousand years. A thousand years, through storm and fire, With varying fate, the work has grown, Till Alexander crowns the spire Where Rurik laid the corner-stone. The chieftain's sword that could not rust, But bright in constant battle grew, Raised to the world a throne august,— A nation grander than he knew. Nor he alone; but those who have, Through faith or deed, an equal part,— The subtle brain of Yaroslav, Vladimir's arm, and Nikon's heart,— The later hands that built so, well The work sublime which these began, And up from base to pinnacle Wrought out the Empire's mighty plan,— All these to
clipsed, in the culture of its upper classes, the refinement of European courts, and matched them in the arts of war and peace, but has boldly struck the shackles of slavery from the limbs of as many million men as now make up the population of all our old Free States. I cannot resist the desire here to link Bayard Taylor's grandest poem with this portion of our historic chain. A thousand years. A thousand years, through storm and fire, With varying fate, the work has grown, Till Alexander crowns the spire Where Rurik laid the corner-stone. The chieftain's sword that could not rust, But bright in constant battle grew, Raised to the world a throne august,— A nation grander than he knew. Nor he alone; but those who have, Through faith or deed, an equal part,— The subtle brain of Yaroslav, Vladimir's arm, and Nikon's heart,— The later hands that built so, well The work sublime which these began, And up from base to pinnacle Wrought out the Empire's mighty plan,— All these to
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