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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. You can also browse the collection for Alexander or search for Alexander in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 8: appointment at Harvard and second visit to Europe (search)
t,—habits always moderate, in both cases, but never in the literal sense abstemious. Friday evening [April, 1834]. . . . He has gone to a Temperance Lecture this evening. He intends becoming a member of the Temperance Society; indeed I do not know but he has signed the paper already. He is a good little dear, and I approve of everything (almost smoking) he does. He is becoming an advocate of vegetable diet, Dr. Mussey's hobby; and Clara and I have nothing but lectures from him and Alexander, upon corsets. The following extract gives us a glimpse of his literary work:— Brunswick, Nov. 2, 1834. Henry comes on famously with Outre Mer. The No. on Spain is finished and that on Italy will be before Thanksgiving. It is by far more interesting than any of the other No's. Henry thinks himself it is much superior in point of interest and in style. I presume he will have the remaining No's published together in N. Y. this winter. In the midst of such literary and househo
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 11: Hyperion and the reaction from it (search)
a year previous, his observation had been again turned towards the American Indians as a theme. Cambridge, October 29, 1837. My dear Margaret,—I was very much delighted with your present of the slippers. They are too pretty to be trodden under foot; yet such is their destiny, and shall be accomplished, as soon as may be. The colors look beautifully upon the drab ground; much more so than on the black. Don't you think so? I should have answered your note, and sent you my thanks, by Alexander on Wednesday last; but when I last saw him, I had not received the package. Therefore you must not imagine from my delay, that I do not sufficiently appreciate the gift. . . . There is nothing very new in Boston, which after all is a gossiping kind of Little Peddlington, if you know what that is; if you don't, you must read the story. People take too much cognizance of their neighbors; interest themselves too much in what no way concerns them. However, it is no great matter. There
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
. Peabody, Rev. O. W. B., 70. Percival, James Gates, 19, 23, 27, 145. Pfizer, Ludwig, his Junggesell, mentioned, 149. Philadelphia, Pa., 22, 51, 132, 164, 166, 192, 193, 264. Phillips, Wendell, 285. Pierce, Mrs. Anne (Longfellow), 91, 92, 100. Pierce, George W., 81, 91, 99,112. Pierpont, Rev., John, 145. Platen, Count von, 191. Pliny, 54. Plymouth, Mass., 12. Poe, Edgar A., 6, 10, 142-144, 168, 259, 267, 269, 276; admiration of Longfellow, 141; influence of, 268. Pope, Alexander, 40. Portland, Me., 11, 13, 14, 19, 57, 60, 61, 87, 98, 106, 172, 189. Portland Academy, 15-17. Portland Gazette, the, 22. Potomac River, 116. Potter, Anne (Storer), 60. Potter, Hon., Barrett, 60, 63; Longfellow's letter to, about his wife's death, 107-111. Potter, Eliza A., 109-111; Longfellow's letter to, 113-115; Longfellow's letter to, announcing his engagement, 172; Frances Appleton's letter to, 174, 175. Potter, Margaret. See Thacher, Mrs. Peter. Potter, Mary