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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Alexander or search for Alexander in all documents.

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l de sac, from which our only escape is the suppression of the rebellion by force. Fifteen months ago we might, perhaps, have peaceably divided the Union; but such a division is now utterly impossible. Later still, if there had been one great statesman in the country, we might have reunited the nation by compromise, or by a diplomatic appeal to the old national feeling against a foreign foe; but now no compromise is possible, and the only diplomacy left us is that of the sword. Like Alexander, we cannot untie, and must cut, the Gordian knot of our affairs. Like C├Žsar, we have passed the Rubicon, and must advance. Like Carter, we have destroyed all means of retreat, and must fight the matter out. The crisis is no longer the comparatively insignificant affair of the secession of a few States, but it is the crisis of our national existence. What Rome suffered during her intestine conflicts; what France suffered during her revolutions; what England suffered during her civil wars