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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 84 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 9 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 3 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 5 3 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for E. Porter Alexander or search for E. Porter Alexander in all documents.

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e 3-inch rifle, U. S. pattern, were the favorite guns; the former, because it was equally adapted to the Brigadier-General E. P. Alexander, who commanded Longstreet's artillery at Gettysburg E. P. Alexander was the Confederate officer who commE. P. Alexander was the Confederate officer who commanded Longstreet's eighty guns in the great artillery battle which preceded Pickett's charge at Gettysburg. He entered the Engineer Corps of the Confederate Army April 2, 1861, and served on the staff of General G. T. Beauregard as engineer and chi Stephen D. Lee, especially at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. This renown was increased under the command of Colonel E. Porter Alexander, afterward brigadier-general and chief of artillery of Longstreet's corps. He had graduated No. 3 at West Poient. In the fight two were killed and Confederate artillery officers: problems of Lee's artillery. After General Alexander became acting chief of artillery, Huger succeeded to the command of his battalion. The fine faces of these officer
o divert attention from himself and the Confederate capital by sending General Early up through the Shenandoah valley into Maryland and against Washington. Practically all the garrison at the Federal capital had been withdrawn from the defenses of the city to reenforce the Army of the Potomac. The troops left behind fit for duty did not suffice to man the armaments of the forts, of which the Engineer Corps and artillery had constructed a line of about thirty-seven miles in length. Colonel Alexander, of the Corps of Engineers, was the only officer of the corps whose personal attention could be given to these defenses. Two of the officers in the office of the chief engineer were ordered to his assistance, and the officers of the corps on fortification duty on the sea-coast, north and east When it was just a question of time before Petersburg It was an unexpected war-time scene before the cottage of Colonel Nathaniel Michler of the Engineer Corps at Brant House, near Petersbu