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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Francis A. Alexander or search for Francis A. Alexander in all documents.

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on with every loyal heart in the Union, to tender to Major-General Butler our high appreciation of his prompt and extensive efforts to aid our comrades, who are yet in the rebel lines, attempting to elude their vigilance, and .make good their escape from that prison of refined cruelty and slow death. This is signed by the following officers, who are all at this time in this city: William B. McCreery, Colonel Twenty-first Michigan infantry; W. P. Kendrick, Colonel West-Tennessee cavalry; Alexander Theobald Von Wizel, Lieutenant-Colonel. Seventy-fourth regiment Pennsylvania volunteer infantry; J. F. Boyd, Lieutenant-Colonel and Quartermaster of volunteers; T. S. West, Lieutenant-Colonel Twenty-fourth Wisconsin volunteer infantry; H. C. Hobert, Lieutenant-Colonel Twenty-first Wisconsin volunteer infantry; J. P. Collins, Major Twentieth Indiana infantry; G. R. Fitzsimmons, Major Thirtieth Indiana volunteers; J. F. Gallaher, Captain company B, Second Ohio volunteer infantry; Matt. Boyd,
river the same night. Sending out a reconnoissance the next morning, under Lieutenant-Colonel Schadt, of the Thirtieth Missouri, it was found that the enemy had never halted in his flight until ten miles from the field of battle, and that they were then in full and rapid retreat toward Trinity or Harrisonburgh. The forces of the enemy were Texan troops, General (or Prince) Polignac's brigade, consisting of the Seventeenth consolidated Texas, Colonel Taylor, three Texan regiments, Colonels Alexander, Stephens, and Hopp, and one battalion Louisiana cavalry, Major Caldwell. The fight was plainly visible from the bluffs of Natchez — every movement of the enemy, every change of our men could be distinctly seen, and the male and female citizens of this loyal city, who had lined the banks to see their brave boys drive the Yankees and niggers into the river, had the satisfaction of seeing one thousand Southrons, with a reserve of five hundred more to fall back on, foiled, whipped, and d