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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book. You can also browse the collection for Henry Alford or search for Henry Alford in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, VI (search)
othing to do with the judgment of posterity. If any foreign country could stand for a contemporaneous posterity, one would think it might be a younger nation judging an older one. Yet how little did the American reputations of fifty years ago afford any sure prediction of permanent fame in respect to English writers! True, we gave early recognition to Carlyle and Tennyson, but scarcely greater than to authors now faded or fading into obscurity,—Milnes (Lord Houghton), Sterling, Trench, Alford, and Bailey. No English poem, it was said, ever sold through so many American editions as Festus; nor was Tupper's Proverbial Philosophy far behind it. Translators and publishers quarrelled bitterly for the privilege of translating Frederika Bremer's novels; but our young people, who already stand for posterity, hardly recall her name. I asked a Swedish commissioner at our Centennial Exhibition in 1876, Is Miss Bremer still read in Sweden? He shook his head; and when I asked, Who has repl
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, X (search)
riod, when Rider Haggard and Oscar Wilde are regarded, they say, as serious and important authors. But just so men looked back in longing from that earlier day to the period of Scott and Wordsworth, and so farther and farther and farther. It is easy for older men to recall when Thackeray and Dickens were in some measure obscured by now forgotten contemporaries, like Harrison Ainsworth and G. P. R. James, and when one was gravely asked whether he preferred Tennyson to Sterling or Trench or Alford or Faber or Milnes. It is to me one of the most vivid reminiscences of my Harvard College graduation (in 1841) that, having rashly ventured upon a commencement oration whose theme was Poetry in an Unpoetical Age, I closed with an urgent appeal to young poets to lay down their Spenser and Tennyson, and look into life for themselves. Prof. Edward T. Channing, then the highest literary authority in New England, paused in amazement with uplifted pencil over this combination of names. You mean
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
Index A. About, Edmond, 82. Addison, Joseph, 119, 196. Aeschylus, 16, 99, 171. Agassiz, Louis, 177. Ainsworth, W. H., 94. Albert, Prince, 28. Albion newspaper, the, 64. Aldrich, T. B., 67, 102. Alford, Henry, 57, 94. American, an, evolution of, 221. American Civil War, literary influence of, 65. American press, as viewed by Irving, 2. Americanism, English standard of, 20. Andersen, H. C., 214. Anglomania, origin of, 64. Anti-slavery agitation, literary influence of, 66. Apologies, unnecessary, 120. Archer, the jockey, 205. Ariosto, Lodovico, 187. Aristophanes, 99, 229. Aristotle, 174, 232. Arnold, Sir, Edwin, 106, 110. Arnold, Matthew, 3, 5, 19, 20, 21, 22, 35, 38, 46, 91, 123, 195, 206, 208. Austen, Jane, 10, 15, 219, 229. Austin, Henry, 101. Austin, Sarah, 144. B. Background, the need of a, 113. Bacon, Lord, 114, 175. Bailey, P. J., 57. Bain, Alexander, 202. Balzac, H. de, 114. Bancroft, George, 107, 155. Banc