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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alger, Cyrus, 1781-1856 (search)
Alger, Cyrus, 1781-1856 Inventor; born in West Bridgewater, Mass., Nov. 11, 1781; became an iron-founder early in life. In 1809 he founded in Boston the works which since 1817 have been known as the South Boston Iron Company. During the War of 1812 he supplied the government with a large number of cannon-balls. He devised many improvements in the construction of time-fuses for bomb-shells and grenades. In 1811 he invented a method of making cast-iron chilled rolls. and in 1822 designed the cylinder stove. The first perfect bronze cannon. the first gun ever rifled in the United States, and the largest gun of cast-iron, the Columbiad mortar, that had been cast in the country, were turned out at his foundry under his personal supervision. He died in Boston, Feb. 4. 1856.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cannon, (search)
rd, of the United States ordnance department, invents a cannon called the columbiad, a long-chambered piece for projecting solid shot and shell with a heavy charge of powder, 1812. West Point foundry established under special patronage of the government, 1817. First contract of Gouverneur Kemble, president, for the West Point Foundry Association, for thirty-two 42-pounders, long guns, July 11, 1820. First gun rifled in America at the South Boston Iron Company's foundry, 1834. Cyrus Alger patents and makes the first malleable iron guns cast and converted in an oven, 1836. Earliest piece of heavy ordnance cast at the South Boston foundry, a 10-in. columbiad, under the supervision of Colonel Bomford; weight, 14,500 lbs.; shot, 130 lbs.; shell, 90 lbs.; charge of powder, 18 lbs., Sept. 6, 1839. Character of gun iron definitely fixed by the metallo-dynamoter, a testing-machine invented by Major Wade, 1840. First 12-in. columbiad; weight, 25,510 lbs.; extreme range,