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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Allan or search for William Allan in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
eat soldiers—three who would compare with the greatest soldiers of ancient or modern times. Struggling as they were without the proper means of carrying on the war —fighting, I may say, the whole world without arms—when the history of it all shall be truly written it will show the greatest record of human resistance, of the power of intellect to combat matter, that the world has ever seen. The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. A Review, by Colonel Wm. Allan. This is one of the most interesting of the Scribner series and is valuable because of the clearness with which it is written, and of the amount of research it shows in bringing together information from widely scattered sources, concerning an exciting and important campaign. As history, too, it is far better than General Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. A Review, by Colonel Wm. Allan. This is one of the most interesting of the Scribner series and is valuable because of the clearness with which it is written, and of the amount of research it shows in bringing together information from widely scattered sources, concerning an exciting and important campaign. As history, too, it is far better than General Doubleday's Gettysburg, though it is far behind the best numbers of the series. Mr. Rope's Army under Pope, and General Palfrey's Antietam, for instance. It is mainly a narrative of the Federal operations in the Valley in 1864, only describing and discussing the Confederate side, so far as is necessary to the comprehension of the achievements of the Union armies. While, too, Mr. Pond's language is temperate, and he aims at fairness, his bias is very evident, and often converts his pages into a defence of, or panegyric upon the Federal commanders.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. By Colonel William Allan, Late Chief of Ordnance Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Is it possible to obtain a correct roster of the Confederate artillery present at Second Manassas, and also of that present during the Sharpsburg campaign? The following is sent, with the hope that it may elicit additions. and corrections: At Second Manassas. On Jackson's wing. Attached to Jackson's Old Division, (Major L. M. Shumaker, Chief of Artillery).—Brockenbrough's Maryland Battery; Carpenter's Virginia Battery; Caskie's (Hampden Artillery); Poague's (Rockbridge Artillery); Raines's (Lee Artillery); Wooding's (Danville Artillery); Rice's; Cutshaw's—(8). Attached to A. P. Hill's Division, (Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker, Chief of Artillery).—Braxton's (Fredericksburg Artillery); Crenshaw's; Davidson's (Letcher Artillery); Latham's (Branch Artillery); McIntosh's (Pee Dee Artillery); Pegram's (Purcell Artillery);
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Allan's history of the Valley campaign. (search)
Allan's history of the Valley campaign. ByMajor F. Scheibert. The readers of the Southern Historical Society Papers may be surprised that a Prussian should venture to give a notice of an American book. But I regard this work of Colonel Allan's, and the beautiful maps of Major Hotchkiss which it contains, as worthy of being held up as a model for military study. The original developmshowed me and I greatly admired during the Gettysburg campaign of 1863,)—all combine to make Colonel Allan's book a military classic. I had already translated into German Colonel Allan's address bColonel Allan's address before the Army of Northern Virginia Association on this campaign, as it appeared in the Southern Historical Society Papers, and had made a lecture on the subject at Stuttgart, as this address gave mee accustomed to accompany all of their chapters by accurate maps; and we hope the example of Colonel Allan will give a new turn to the military literature of the valiant South. We tender him our s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
nel C. S. Venable, Colonel J. W. Massie (deceased—in his place Colonel Bolivar Christian, May 31, 1873), Colonel Charles A. Davidson (deceased—in his place A. T. Barclay, Esq., June 22, 1882), Judge William McLaughlin, Major J. B. Dorman, Colonel William Allan, Colonel William Preston Johnston, Captain J. C. Boude, Professor J. J. White, Captain A. Graham, General William Terry, Hon. W. A. Anderson, Captain Walter Bowie, General John Echols, Colonel T. S. Flournoy, Rev. J. William Jones, D. D.,ral E. G. Lee; Mrs. Margaret J. Preston; Mrs. W. H. F. Lee and her two boys; Captain Robert E. Lee; W. W. Corcoran Esq., of Washington; Father Ryan, Colonel T. M. R. Talcott and Colonel H. E. Peyton, former members of General Lee's staff; Colonel William Allan of Stonewall Jackson's old staff; Colonel William H. Palmer, of General A. P. Hill's staff; the Trustees and Faculty of Washington and Lee University, and the Virginia Military Institute; and a number of others too numerous to mention. T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. (search)
The Virginia campaign of 1864-1865. A Review of General Humphreys by Colonel William Allan. The last of the Campaigns of the Civil War, issued by the Scribners, forms in every way a fitting and creditable conclusion of the series. This volume has been looked for with unusual interest, because of its author and of the period treated of; nor does it disappoint the public expectation. An officer among the highest in rank in the Army of the Potomac, arid one whose rank was not more distinguished than his services to the Union cause, General Humphreys brings to his task peculiar advantages. As Chief of Staff to General Meade, his official position rendered him familiar with all the Federal movements in the campaign of 1864, while his subsequent career as commander of Hancock's (Second) corps was not less conspicuous and important. His long and eminent service after the war in Washington placed within his easy reach all the official data now extant in regard to the struggle. We ar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
or some of the artillery officers at hand (Colonel Carter for instance) give the assignment of the large number of batteries which Colonel Scott classes as miscellaneous? Some of them are, perhaps, only different names for batteries already enumerated. The artillery reports are, I know from experience, sometimes exasperating in their want of precision as regards names and commands, and it is therefore not surprising that Colonel Scott despaired of placing these batteries. Truly yours, W. Allan. I think there was no such organization as 8th Virginia battalion in Armistead's brigade. Who and What Conquered the South? We give, without comment, the answer to this question contained in an article by Mr. Richard Grant White, high authority with the cultured classes of the North, in the September number of the North American Review: The South had fought to maintain an inequality of personal rights and an aristocratic form of society. The North had fought, not in a crusade f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society. (search)
ushed to the full fruition of our hopes. Adopted by the unanimous vote of the Committee October 30, 1883. J. William Jones, Secretary. On motion of Colonel William Allan, of Maryland (formerly Chief of Ordnance of the Second Corps A. N. V.), the report was adopted by the meeting. Remarks of Colonel Allan. In moving thColonel Allan. In moving the adoption of the report, Colonel Allan said: Mr. President,—In making this motion I cannot refrain from expressing the gratification which the reports just read have given us. The condition of the Society, as shown by them, is better than ever before in our history. To have no debt, and at the same time to have assets actual, Colonel Allan said: Mr. President,—In making this motion I cannot refrain from expressing the gratification which the reports just read have given us. The condition of the Society, as shown by them, is better than ever before in our history. To have no debt, and at the same time to have assets actual, or within reach, of $12,000 or more, besides a subscription list adequate for current expenses, is indeed an excellent showing, and justifies our congratulations to the Executive Committee and officers of the Society upon their successful management. The work done by the Society has been most important and valuable. For years i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
eneral Scales's address on The Battle of Fredericksburg, but the committee of the Association having accorded that privilege to our friends Carlton McCarthy & Co., Richmond, (from whom copies in pamphlet form can be had), we content ourselves now with saying that it was an able and eloquent description of one of the greatest victories of the war. We shall hereafter make copious extracts from it. Nor can we now speak of the splendid banquet, at which admirable speeches were made by Colonel William Allan, of Maryland, Captain John Milledge, of Georgia, Rev. H. Melville Jackson, of Richmond, General Early, Judge Theo. S. Garnett, of Norfolk, Colonel Moore, of North Carolina, and others. We are glad to be able to give in full the Speech of Rev. H. Melville Jackson. Our dead We care not whence they came, Dear in their lifeless clay; Whether unknown or known to fame, Their cause and country still the same- They died-and wore the gray. Father Ryan. Mr. Chairman and Gentl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
We warmly commend this style of making up records to other organizations, and would advise all interested in securing these very valuable papers, to write at once to the publishers, Carlton McCarthy & Co., Richmond, Va., to whose courtesy we are indebted for our copy. ceremonies connected with the inauguration of the Mausoleum and the unveiling of the Recumbent figure of General Robert Edward Lee, at washing-Ton and Lee University, Lexington, Va., June 28TH, 1883— oration of John W. Daniel, Ll.D.—Historical sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. Richmond, Va.: West, Johnston & Co. The publishers have sent us a copy of this beautifully gotten up pamphlet, of which it is only necessary to say that the compilation was done by the skilful hand, and the sketch of the Association was written by the graceful pen of our friend, Colonel William Allan. Send twenty-five cents to the publishers and secure a copy. St. Nicholas and the century for December are both superb numbe