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George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Allan or search for William Allan in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
re so conspicuous a part, and in which battle, all together, the State of South Carolina suffered so terribly. Colonel William Allan, who was Chief of Ordnance on General Jackson's staff, and who is as able a writer as he was a faithful and gallashall is well illustrated, my comrades, in the history of the battle in which we took the prominent part mentioned by Colonel Allan. No battle of the late war has been so much studied and discussed as that of the second day of the Second Manassas, Jackson's corps at Manassas at seventeen thousand three hundred and nine, Four Years with General Lee, page 61. but Colonel Allan, after a very careful computation, puts the strength of Jackson's infantry at twenty-two thousand five hundred. Soutmparison by which the disproportionate loss of South Carolina troops in this battle can be more accurately shown. By Colonel Allan's estimate, as we have seen, Jackson's corps of infantry was 22,500 strong, and he puts Longstreet's at 26,768. Ibid
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From the Rapidan to Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
ted of Lieutenant-Colonel A. S. Pendleton and Major Campbell Brown, Acting Adjutant-Generals; Colonel A. Smead (Colonel of Artillery), Acting Inspector-General; Major B. H. Greene, Engineer; Lieutenant Thomas T. Turner, Aide-de-camp; Lieutenant-Colonel William Allan, Chief of Ordnance; Surgeon Hunter McGuire, Medical Director; Majors John Rogers and A. S. Garber, Quartermasters (Major Harman having been transferred just before the campaign opened); Major W. J. Hawks and Captain J. J. Locke, Comm in the line, if it were possible to fill his place on the staff. It is but simple justice to say that the quiet and efficient manner in which Surgeon McGuire performed the duties of his important department left nothing to be desired, while Colonel Allan's abilities were recognized at headquarters by both compliments and promotion. Major Brown had been with me from the first battle of Manassas, and on nearly every field had been intrusted with important duties. On no occasion did I have rea