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The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Pennsylvania, (search)
776) did a quorum of members of the Pennsylvania Assembly appear. The proprietary government had expired. The gloomy outlook after the fall of Fort Washington and the flight of Washington and his melting army across New Jersey in 1776 caused many persons of influence in Pennsylvania, as well as in New Jersey, to waver and fall away from the patriot cause. The most conspicuous of these in Pennsylvania were Joseph Galloway, who had been a member of the first Continental Congress, and Andrew Allen, also a member of that Congress, and two of his brothers. The brothers Howe having issued a new proclamation of pardon and amnesty to all who should within sixty days promise not to take up arms against the King, these men availed themselves of it, not doubting their speedy restoration to their former fortunes and political importance. They went over to Howe; so did Samuel Tucker, a leader in the movements against British oppression in New Jersey, and a host of Jerseymen, who signed a p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), People's party. (search)
pulists are largely in majority over Democrats, they united in support of a ticket headed by a Democrat. In Kansas the patronage of the State administration (Populist) is divided among the parties to the triple alliance of 1896. These things indicate the direction of political wind currents. They are signs full of meaning, and none but the blind can fail to comprehend their significance. Mr. Bryan, on his part, has already contributed $1,500 to the People's party campaign fund, and Senator Allen has invested the money in interest-bearing securities that it may increase unto the day of its use in promoting the cause of bimetallism. On the other hand, the Anti-fusionists wish to maintain their party relations, and they do not see how they can do that by supporting some other party, more especially one whose principles do not accord with their own; and the division growing out of this difference is fatal. It is drawn on the dead-line. These Antifusionists are like Cubans in th
8, a. 26, and he m. Catherine Lopaus (or Lopez), 29 Dec. 1781. His chil. were Susanna, b. 6 Dec. 1780, m. Artenatus Moore 7 Feb. 1802, and d.--May 1807; Nancy, b. 23 Oct. 1782, d. unm., of consumption, 24 Dec. 1803; Priscilla, b. 9 Ap. 1784, d. unm., of consumption, 5 Nov. 1803; William, b. 13 June 1785, grad. H. C. 1805, d. unm., of consumption, 4 Nov. 1805; Mary, bap. 29 May and d.—Nov. 1787; Mary, b. 12 Dec. 1788, d. unm., of consumption, 22 July 1812; Elizabeth, b. 28 Jan. 1794, m. Andrew Allen 31 Dec. 1826, and d. 14 Mar. 1868; Samuel, b. 2 Feb. 1796, unm., for many years an inmate of the McLean Asylum for the Insane, and d. 18 June 1857; Abraham Andros, b. 11 May 1799, grad. H. C. 1823, a physician, resided in Boston, and d. 14 June 1868. William the f. was a glazier, and res. on the S. E. corner of Brighton and Mount Auburn streets, the homestead of his maternal grandfather (Deac. Whittemore), which he obtained by purchase. He also owned a large tract of land in Cambridge
8, a. 26, and he m. Catherine Lopaus (or Lopez), 29 Dec. 1781. His chil. were Susanna, b. 6 Dec. 1780, m. Artenatus Moore 7 Feb. 1802, and d.--May 1807; Nancy, b. 23 Oct. 1782, d. unm., of consumption, 24 Dec. 1803; Priscilla, b. 9 Ap. 1784, d. unm., of consumption, 5 Nov. 1803; William, b. 13 June 1785, grad. H. C. 1805, d. unm., of consumption, 4 Nov. 1805; Mary, bap. 29 May and d.—Nov. 1787; Mary, b. 12 Dec. 1788, d. unm., of consumption, 22 July 1812; Elizabeth, b. 28 Jan. 1794, m. Andrew Allen 31 Dec. 1826, and d. 14 Mar. 1868; Samuel, b. 2 Feb. 1796, unm., for many years an inmate of the McLean Asylum for the Insane, and d. 18 June 1857; Abraham Andros, b. 11 May 1799, grad. H. C. 1823, a physician, resided in Boston, and d. 14 June 1868. William the f. was a glazier, and res. on the S. E. corner of Brighton and Mount Auburn streets, the homestead of his maternal grandfather (Deac. Whittemore), which he obtained by purchase. He also owned a large tract of land in Cambridge
Drowned. --On Saturday last, a lad named Andrew Allen, was drowned in the Dock. With two other boys young Allen was at play on the ice, which was very rotten, when the party broke through and disappeared. Two of the lads soon arose at the opening through which they fell, and succeeded in getting out, but Allen went under tdrowned in the Dock. With two other boys young Allen was at play on the ice, which was very rotten, when the party broke through and disappeared. Two of the lads soon arose at the opening through which they fell, and succeeded in getting out, but Allen went under the ice, and drowned before any assistance could be rendered him. drowned in the Dock. With two other boys young Allen was at play on the ice, which was very rotten, when the party broke through and disappeared. Two of the lads soon arose at the opening through which they fell, and succeeded in getting out, but Allen went under the ice, and drowned before any assistance could be rendered him.