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und shall awake him to glory again, till the summons of the great Judge, announcing to him the reward of the faithful soldier, who has fought the good fight. Patton, Otey, and Terry, who, but a moment since, stood at their respective regiments, are wounded. The brave Hunton, hero of Leesburgh, most worthy successor of the noble Garnett, Stewart, and Gant, lies wounded. Carrington, his gallant regiment shattered, stands firmly, flaunting defiantly his colors in the very face of the enemy. Allen and Ellis killed. Hodges, too, has fallen, and the modest, chivalrous Edmunds lies numbered with the noble dead; Aylett wounded, and Magruder has gone down in the shock of battle. The fight goes on — but few are left; and the shrinking columns of the enemy gain confidence from the heavy reenforcements advanced to their support. They, too, are moving in large force on the right flank. This division, small at first, with ranks now torn and shattered, most of its officers killed or wounded,
state that Colonel Chamberlain, of the Eleventh Louisiana A. D., conducted himself in a very unsoldier-like manner. The enemy consisted of one brigade, numbering about two thousand five hundred, in command of General McCulloch, and two hundred cavalry. The enemy's loss is estimated at about one hundred and fifty killed, and three hundred wounded. It is impossible to get any thing near the loss of the enemy, as they carried killed and wounded off in ambulances. Among their killed is Colonel Allen, Sixteenth Texas. Inclosed please find tabular statements of killed, wounded, and missing, in all six hundred and fifty-two. Nearly all the missing blacks will probably be returned, as they were badly scattered. The enemy, under General Hawes, advanced upon Young's Point, whilst the battle was going on at Milliken's Bend, but several well-directed shots from the gunboats compelled them to retire. See page 12, Docs. ante. Submitting the foregoing, I remain yours respectfully,
nearly one hundred outhouses, stores, etc. We have succeeded in obtaining a list of the property owners who have suffered by the burning of their beautiful houses and settlements: General J. F. Drayton, Colonel J. J. Stoney, Dr. J. W. Kirk, George Allen, Dr. Paul Pritchard, M. J. Kirk, J. McKenzie, A. Crosby, G. Allen, Dr. A. G. Verdier, Estate H. Guerard, Jos. Baynard, Jas. Seabrook, G. W. Lawton, W. Pope, Dr. Mellichamp, Dr. F. H. Pope, R. R. Pope, J. J. Pope, A. G. Verdier, Henry Verdier, G. Allen, Dr. A. G. Verdier, Estate H. Guerard, Jos. Baynard, Jas. Seabrook, G. W. Lawton, W. Pope, Dr. Mellichamp, Dr. F. H. Pope, R. R. Pope, J. J. Pope, A. G. Verdier, Henry Verdier, Squ<*>re Popes, Mr. Strobhart, Mrs. Hardee, J. Chalmers, J. G. Bulichen, D. & J. Canter, D. Freeman,--Crosby,--Langballe,--Chalmers, W. Winn, J. Bulichen, Mrs. Pickney, Mrs. Winingham, B. Wiggins, Estate Norton, H. F. Train,--Martain, (f. p. c.) The enemy approached in transports, and landed about one thousand strong at what is known as Hunting Island. Five gunboats covered their landing, which was successfully accomplished about half-past 6 o'clock on the fourth instant. Three companies of t
usand present for duty in his cavalry division and eighteen pieces of artillery — showing an aggregate of about twelve thousand fit for duty. Brigadier-Generals Kimball and Salomon obtained leaves of absence, and the resignation of General Ross was accepted, which left me with but one general officer--Davidson. The resignation of my Assistant Adjutant-General was accepted just at this time, and there were no officers of the Quartermaster's and Subsistence Department at Helena, except Captain Allen, A. C. S., and Captain Noble, A. Q. M., who were in charge of the stores in the depot. I ordered the establishment of camps for the sick and convalescents, and organized the command in the best manner possible. Davidson pushed on to Clarendon, and established a ferry for crossing the troops; corduroying two miles of bottom, and laying down the pontoon-bridge across Rock Roe Bayou. On the nineteenth of August, the Helena troops organized into a division, Colonel now Brigadier-General S
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
nces were Lib. 8.100. thoroughly abolitionized, and it was estimated that a thousand itinerant clergymen of that denomination were abolitionists. In Massachusetts, five-sixths of the ministers of Franklin County, of all denominations, united in Lib. 8.91. a declaration against slavery and in favor of immediate emancipation; and in the same spirit, but more weightily, a clerical convention assembled at Worcester delivered Lib. 8.33. itself, under the inspiration and leadership of the Rev. George Allen. Side by side with this moral and religious quickening, the political measures already employed by the abolitionists not only were maintained, but assumed a fresh and for the moment an overshadowing importance. Petitioning to Congress went on, in forms new and old, against the standing iniquity of Federal slaveholding, against impending extensions of the area of slavery, The bare enumeration of anti-slavery and anti-Texas memorials, largely from women, presented in the House o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
n (at the quarterly meeting) as if he were whip-master-general and supreme judge of all abolitionists; as though he wore the triple crown, and wielded an irresponsible sceptre over all the embattled hosts of anti-slavery troops. And even the Rev. George Allen, of Shrewsbury, declared Mr. Garrison resolved Lib. 9.67. to cripple the influence of all who will not come under the yoke which he has bent for their necks. The annual meeting was held on January 23, in the Lib. 9.18. Marlboroa Chapact with the Society. The opposition came chiefly from clergymen, and these from Massachusetts; Nathaniel Colver moving that the Lib. 9.82. committee enroll only men. With him voted his brother ministers Phelps, Orange Scott, George Storrs, George Allen, Beriah Green, La Roy Sunderland, among others, together with Birney and Lewis Tappan. Gerrit Smith, who was in the chair, and voted for the admission of women, thought that five to one were on his side, but Lewis Tappan called for the yeas a
his (anonymous) contributions, 43; journey to Mobile, 48, 49; aids G. to found Free Press, 60, reproved for obituary of Jefferson, 63; notice of G.'s Baltimore trial, 184, G.'s reply, 185.—Letters from F. M. Garrison, 1.51, G., 52, 185. Allen, George, Rev. [b. Worcester, Mass., Feb. 1, 1792; d. there Mar. 31, 1883], head of Worcester Convention, 2.244; alienated from G., 271, opposes enrolment of women, 297.—Portrait in Reminiscences, 1883. Allen, Richard, 2.380. Allen, William [1770-184egates to World's Convention, 2.375, acquaintance with G., 384, hospitality, 387. Orthodox Congregationalists, Conn. manifesto against itinerant moralists, 2.130, 135; Mass. Pastoral Letter, 133-136, 198.—See also J. S. C. Abbott, N. Adams, G. Allen, L. Bacon, L. Beecher, G. W. Blagden, H. Bushnell, A. Cummings, C. G. Finney, C. Fitch, R. B. Hall, J. Le Bosquet, N. Lord, A. A. Phelps, G. Shepherd, C. B. Storrs, M. Stuart, M. Thacher, C. T. Torrey, J. H. Towne, J. Tracy, J. T. Woodbury. O<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 31: the prison—discipline debates in Tremont Temple.—1846-1847. (search)
and by Hillard, who appeared only once in the debate, urging fairness in the reports of the Society, and rebuking an anonymous newspaper attack on Sumner. Sumner, Howe, and Hillard were the subjects of coarse attacks in communications printed in the Boston Post, June 2, 4, 9, and 22. The first article was replied to by a writer in that journal, June 5. The Boston Advertiser, June 26 and 30, contained communications friendly to Dwight. On the other side there were several speakers,—Rev. George Allen, of Worcester, who consumed one hour in his first speech and two in another, comparing to some extent the two systems, but chiefly defending with friendly zeal Mr. Dwight; Bradford Sumner, a lawyer respectable in character, but moderate in professional attainments; J. Thomas Stevenson, who confessed that he knew nothing about prison discipline, and whose late participation in the debate was due only to his political antipathy to Sumner and Dr. Howe; and Francis C. Gray, 1796-1856. M
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
erence at Dr. Bailey's office in Washington, D. C., before the election of 1852, is given in the Reminiscences of the Rev. George Allen, pp. 99, 100, purporting to have been obtained by Mr. Allen from Mr. Giddings on the latter's visit to Worcester,Mr. Allen from Mr. Giddings on the latter's visit to Worcester, Mass., at some time later than 1852. Conferences were probably held at Dr. Bailey's house; but Mr. Allen's report of what Sumner and others said is not authentic. Chase's inclinings were not, as stated by Mr. Allen, to General Scott, but rather tMr. Allen's report of what Sumner and others said is not authentic. Chase's inclinings were not, as stated by Mr. Allen, to General Scott, but rather to a Democratic candidate of Free Soil sympathies. He was specially anxious to keep the Free Soilers from becoming embarrassed by premature declarations in favor of a candidate whom they might find themselves unable to support without a sacrifice ofMr. Allen, to General Scott, but rather to a Democratic candidate of Free Soil sympathies. He was specially anxious to keep the Free Soilers from becoming embarrassed by premature declarations in favor of a candidate whom they might find themselves unable to support without a sacrifice of their principles. From what he wrote it is not likely that he would have been content with Scott except with a guaranty that he would in his Administration treat freedom as national and slavery as sectional. He wrote to Adams, April 16: My own po
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 58: the battle-flag resolution.—the censure by the Massachusetts Legislature.—the return of the angina pectoris. —absence from the senate.—proofs of popular favor.— last meetings with friends and constituents.—the Virginius case.—European friends recalled.—1872-1873. (search)
e first one, Ex-Governor William Claflin, who opened the case briefly for the petitioners, was followed by Ex-Governor Emory Washburn the jurist, and by Rev. James Freeman Clarke. An erroneous statement is made in the Reminiscences of the Rev. George Allen, p. 102, that Sumner requested Mr. Allen to appear before the committee. The senator requested no one to appear before it, by letter or otherwise. These last two gentlemen spoke with earnestness and power; but their free comments on the Mr. Allen to appear before the committee. The senator requested no one to appear before it, by letter or otherwise. These last two gentlemen spoke with earnestness and power; but their free comments on the action of the last Legislature offended the members who by reelection were members of the former as well as the present body. Hoyt appeared, on the other hand, to object to any interference with the action of the last Legislature of which he had been the promoter. To the surprise of the public, he was supported by William Lloyd Garrison, who had been bitter in his censures of Sumner for opposing the President's re-election. Mr. Garrison's tone in this debate, depreciatory of Sumner, was in
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