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Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 14 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
les A. Zollinger; 130th Ind., Col. Charles S. Parrish; 99th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. John E. Cummins. Artillery: 23d Ind., Lieut. Luther M. Houghton, Lieut. Aaron A. Wilber; 24th Ind. (assigned to cavalry division July 6th), Capt. Alexander Hardy, Lieut. Hiram Allen. Second division, Brig.-Genu. Henry M. Judah, Brig.-Gen. Milo S. Hascall. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Nathaniel C. McLean, Brig.-Gen. Joseph A. Cooper: 80th Ind. (transferred to Second Brigade June 8th), Lienut.-Col. Alfred D. Owen, Maj. Col. W. D. Hamilton was in command. It consisted of the 9th Mich., Lieut.-Col. W. B. Way; 7th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. G. C. Miner; detachment 9th Ohio, Capt. L. H. Bowlus; McLaughlin's Ohio Squadron, Maj. Richard Rice; and the 24th Ind. Battery, Lieut. Hiram Allen. The Dismounted Brigade, commanded by Col. Horace Capron, was composed of the 14th and 16th lll., 5th and 6th Ind., and 12th Ky. The 16th Ill. was detailed as provost guard Twenty-third Corps from August 16th, and the 12th Ky. as cattle gu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
ttached: 3d Ky.,--; 28th Mich., Col. William W. Wheeler; 173d Ohio, Col. John R. Hurd; 78th Pa. (detachment), Lieut.-Col. Henry W. Torbett; Veteran Reserve Corps, Col. Frank P. Cahill; 44th Wis. (battalion), Lieut.-Col. Oliver C. Bissell; 45th Wis. (battalion),--. garrison artillery, Maj. John J. Ely: 2d Ind., Capt. James S. Whicher; 4th Ind., Capt. Benjamin F. Johnson; 12th Ind., Capt. James E. White; 21st Ind., Capt. Abram P. Andrew; 22d Ind., Capt. Edward W. Nicholson; 24th Ind., Lieut. Hiram Allen; F, 1st Mich., Capt. Byron D. Paddock; E, 1st Ohio, Lieut. Frank B. Reckard; 20th Ohio, Capt. William Backus; C, 1st Tenn., Lieut. Joseph Grigsby; D, 1st Tenn., Capt. Samuel D. Leinart; A, 2d U. S. Colored, Capt. Josiah V. Meigs. quartermaster's ]division (composed of quarter-master's employees), Col. James L. Donaldson. cavalry Corps, Brig.-Gen. James H. Wilson. Escort: 4th U. S., Lieut. Joseph Hedges. first division (Second and Third Brigades, under Brig.-Gen. E. M. McCook,
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
nt of money paid by the town during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $411.58; in 1862, $1,844.74; in 1863, $2,999.83; in 1864, $4,674.09; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total amount, $12,130.24. Webster Incorporated March 6, 1832. Population in 1860, 2,912; in 1865, 3,608. Valuation in 1860, $1,045,039; in 1865, $1,060,039. The selectmen in 1861 were Henry E. Bugbee, Lyman Sheldon, Nathan Joslin; in 1862, Nathan Joslin, Hiram Allen, Nathan Chamberlain; in 1863, Nathan Joslin, Emory Sibley, Benjamin A. Corbin; in 1864, Emory Sibley, Benjamin A. Corbin, Frederick D. Brown; in 1865, Frederick D. Brown, John F. Hinds, Solomon Robinson. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Seymour A. Tingier. The town-treasurer during the same period was William T. Shumway. 1861. The first town-meeting to act upon matters relating to the war was held on the 29th of April, at which it was voted to pay each volunteer b
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908,
Union Square
and its neighborhood about the year 1846. (search)
utions were passed, without a dissenting voice. East of Mr. Bennett's was the residence of Hiram Allen, rope and twine manufacturer, whose rope walk, run by tide power, was on the south side of Somerville avenue, east of Prospect street, on Miller's creek. Hiram Allen, Jr., the leader of Allen's band, still lives in the old home. Mr. Allen had two other children, Margaret and Lucy. Beyond MAllen's band, still lives in the old home. Mr. Allen had two other children, Margaret and Lucy. Beyond Mr. Allen's was the yellow block, still standing, occupied about this time by the family of Mr. Fellows, and previously by Clark Bennett. Further on was the residence of Ivers Hill, provision dealer;Mr. Allen had two other children, Margaret and Lucy. Beyond Mr. Allen's was the yellow block, still standing, occupied about this time by the family of Mr. Fellows, and previously by Clark Bennett. Further on was the residence of Ivers Hill, provision dealer; oil portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Hill were in the last exhibition of the Historical Society. East of Mr. Hill's was the residence of Charles Miller, clothing dealer in Boston. Mr. Miller had the honoMr. Allen's was the yellow block, still standing, occupied about this time by the family of Mr. Fellows, and previously by Clark Bennett. Further on was the residence of Ivers Hill, provision dealer; oil portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Hill were in the last exhibition of the Historical Society. East of Mr. Hill's was the residence of Charles Miller, clothing dealer in Boston. Mr. Miller had the honor of naming Somerville. Some of his descendants still reside in Somerville. He was the great-grandson of James Miller, the Somerville minuteman killed on Prospect Hill on April 19, 1775, by the Bri
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908,
Union Square
before the War.—(Il) (search)
d stream, whose waters rose and fell with the tide, and it was well stocked with fish, the smelt, flounder, and tomcod being the most numerous. Where the river crossed the railroad the fourth time, east of Prospect Street, the culvert was a structure of large dimensions, popularly known as the box, and here could often be seen in summer the bathers, in winter the skaters, and fishermen both seasons. Previous to 1860 there was a rope walk east of Prospect Street, owned and operated by Hiram Allen, and furnished with water power from the river, which was raised by a dam at that point. A hundred or more years ago there was a public watering place where Miller's River crossed Prospect Street; this street was laid out about 1804, and was early known as Pine Street, but Newton Street, previously called Brick Yard Lane, was a century or so ago called the way by Bullard's Bridge. Miller's River had one other branch, which commenced not far from the junction of Newton and Springfield St
Index Adams, Henry, 7. Adams, John, 52. Adams, Joseph, 50, 52, 53. Adams, Major, Joseph, 52. Adams, Rebecca, 50. Adams, Sanford, 6, 14. Alewife Brook, 26, 53. Allen, Alfred, 55. Allen, Benjamin F., 12. Allen, Hiram, 11, 34. Allen, Hiram, Jr., 11. Allen, Lucy, 11. Allen, Margaret, 11. Alsop's Farm, 56, 57. Alston Street, 9. American Flag, The First, 81. American Navy, The, 84. Amesbury, Mass., 1. Anderson, 56. Andersonville Prison, 22. Andrew, Governor, 43. AnAllen, Hiram, Jr., 11. Allen, Lucy, 11. Allen, Margaret, 11. Alsop's Farm, 56, 57. Alston Street, 9. American Flag, The First, 81. American Navy, The, 84. Amesbury, Mass., 1. Anderson, 56. Andersonville Prison, 22. Andrew, Governor, 43. Antietam Bridge, 20. Arlington, D. C., 18. Arlington, Mass., 26. Armory, The, 81. Army of the Potomac, 44, 56. Arnold, J. Frank, 8. Arnold, Leonard, 8, 10. Arnold, William J., 56. Associated Charities, 75. Austin, Richard, 29. Avery, Mathew, 30. Ayer, John F., 74, 76. Ayer, William, 28. Bachelder, Abigail, 29. Bachelder, William, 29. Baker, Rev., Charles, 39. Baker, William, 30. Baker, William A., 18. Baltimore, Md., 77. Banks, Governor, 38. Banks, Hon. N. P., Jr., 42.