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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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herine, dau. of Gov. Gurdon Salton-stall, 23 Nov. 1727, and had William, b. 4. Jan. 1728-9, d. 14 Oct. 1730; Katherine, b. 2 June 1730, m. John Mico Wendell 13 Aug. 1752, and d. 30 Jan. 1821; Mary, bap. 18 March 1732-3; Elizabeth, bap. 16 June 1734; Sarah, bap. 20 June 1736; William, bap. 8 Oct. 1738; Lucy, bap. 30 Mar. 1740; Thomas, bap. 14 Feb. 1741-2; Elizabeth, bap. 8 May 1743. Only Katherine and Thomas survived to maturity. His w. Katherine d. 28 April 1752, a. 47, and he m. wid. Martha Allen of Boston, dau. of Thomas Fitch, Esq. William the f. grad. H. C. 1722, resided in the house which still bears his name on Brattle Street, and was successively physician, preacher, and lawyer, and was Attorney-general, 1736 and 1747. An inordinate love of popularity seems to have been one of his most striking characteristics; and his taste was abundantly gratified. He was appointed Justice of the Peace, 1729, at the early age of twenty-three years; was Selectman twenty-one years, betwee
herine, dau. of Gov. Gurdon Salton-stall, 23 Nov. 1727, and had William, b. 4. Jan. 1728-9, d. 14 Oct. 1730; Katherine, b. 2 June 1730, m. John Mico Wendell 13 Aug. 1752, and d. 30 Jan. 1821; Mary, bap. 18 March 1732-3; Elizabeth, bap. 16 June 1734; Sarah, bap. 20 June 1736; William, bap. 8 Oct. 1738; Lucy, bap. 30 Mar. 1740; Thomas, bap. 14 Feb. 1741-2; Elizabeth, bap. 8 May 1743. Only Katherine and Thomas survived to maturity. His w. Katherine d. 28 April 1752, a. 47, and he m. wid. Martha Allen of Boston, dau. of Thomas Fitch, Esq. William the f. grad. H. C. 1722, resided in the house which still bears his name on Brattle Street, and was successively physician, preacher, and lawyer, and was Attorney-general, 1736 and 1747. An inordinate love of popularity seems to have been one of his most striking characteristics; and his taste was abundantly gratified. He was appointed Justice of the Peace, 1729, at the early age of twenty-three years; was Selectman twenty-one years, betwee
er of Michael Jones, a Texan soldier, was brought up from the station-house, but the witnesses being absent, the case was continued until the 10th instant, and the prisoner committed to jail. Thomas Lillis, charged with receiving $170 in money, alleged to have been stolen from Elizabeth Demelman, was again arraigned, but at the request of the prisoner's counsel, the investigation was adjourned over to this morning, to give him an opportunity to procure testimony. Esau, a slave, the property of Martha Allen, was taken into custody on suspicion of being a runaway, and punished in the usual way. Esau is one of those free and easy darkeys who manage to ring in for a daily these of pottage without rendering a due equivalent in the shape of manual labor. Maria Canary, for selling liquor without a license, was fined $5. A fine of $1 was imposed upon Mr. Paul Bargamin, in consequence of the delinquency of his servant, who drove a vehicle across the sidewalk of 4th street.