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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 21 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 7 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 15: resignation from the army.-marriage to Miss Taylor.-Cuban visit.-winter in Washington.-President van Buren.-return to Brierfield, 1837. (search)
omas H. Benton from Missouri; his colleague, Dr. Lewis F. Linn; William Allen, Senator of Ohio; Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, and forty avis and I accompanied Dr. Linn, the Senator from Missouri, and Senator Allen, of Ohio, to a reception given by the Secretary of War. Dr. Linn and I returned home, leaving Senator Allen and Davis to return with John J. Crittenden, of Kentucky, at Crittenden's request. After Dr. Linn and I got to bed, we heard the voice of Allen at a distance. He and Davis soon entered our room. Mr. Davis was bleeding profusely fre, and upon his white tie, shirt-front, and white waistcoat. Mr. Allen, who had been drinking champagne freely, was somewhat intoxicated, and missing the bridge (Mr. Allen being supposed to be familiar with the road) Davis had followed him, and they had both fallen into the Tiber, a small stream which they had to cross. Allen had alighted on his feet, but Mr. Davis, who was perfectly sober, had endeavored to save
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 25: the storming of Monterey-report of Mr. Davis. (search)
follow him they will be sure to succeed, and they think so, too, with some reason, for during the conflict we attacked, and several times took, places and fortifications from which regular troops, greatly outnumbering us, had been three times repulsed by the Mexicans with considerable loss of life. I never wish to be commanded by a truer soldier than Colonel Davis. A short extract is subjoined from the report of General Taylor on the battle of Monterey: I desire also to notice Generals Hamer and Quitman, commanding brigades in General Butler's division; Lieutenant-Colonel Garland and Wilson, commanding brigades in General Twigg's division; Colonels Mitchell, Campbell, Davis, and Wood, commanding the Ohio, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Second Texas Regiments respectively; and Senior Majors Allen and Abercrombie, commanding Third, Fourth, and First Regiments of infantry, all of whom served under my eye and conducted their commands with coolness and gallantry against the enemy.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
tain Alex. M. Pennock, Fleet-Captain and Commandant of Station; Commander Fabius Stanley, Ordnance Officer; Fleet-Paymaster, E. W. Dunn; Paymasters, W. B. Boggs and A. H. Gilman; Assistant-Fleet-Paymaster, John Reed; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Harvey; Surgeon, J. W. Shively; Acting-Chief-Engineer, Wm. D. Faulkner; Acting-Masters, P. O. Kell and J. W. Atkinson; Acting-Ensigns, C. F. Nellis and J. M. Bailey; Acting Master's Mate, Rivers Drake; Gunner, J. C. Ritter; Acting-Boatswain, William Allen; Acting-Gunners, A. P. Snyder and L. K. Ellis. Marine officers. Captain, M. R. Kintzing; Second-Lieutenants, F. L. Church and C. H. Humphrey. Naval station, Memphis, Tenn. Lieutenant Commander, Thomas Pattison; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Benton; Acting-Master, H. S. Wetmore; Acting-First-Assistant Engineer, Wm. Apperly. Receiving ship Clara Dolsen. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, John Scott; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, C. E. Vaughan; Paymaster, Edward May; Acting-Assi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
-Third-Assistants, H. J. Tarr and J. B. Johnston. Fernandina--Fourth-rate. Acting-Masters, Lewis West and George F. Hollis; Acting-Ensigns, Christopher Flood, B. H. Chadwick and Charles Sawyer; Acting-Masters Mate, Wm. C. King; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, S. B. Kenney; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, T. N. Murray. Houghlen--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, E. S. Fusher; Acting-Ensigns, C. M. Shirving and Jacob Cochran; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Israel Bashong; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, R W. Allen. Daffodil--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Wm. H. Mallard; Acting-Ensign, John McGlathery; Acting-Master's Mate, N. B. Walker; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. H. Capen, Thomas Forrest and John Tucker. Orvetta--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Wm. Fales; Acting-Ensigns, E. W. Halcro, Charles Nellman and D. W. Andrews; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Samuel A. Kay. Hydranga--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Charles W. Rodgers; Acting-Master's Mates, J. B. Newcomb, J. G. Underhill and
o add to the House proposition an alternative contemplating negotiation as a means of effecting the end proposed: and this was carried by 27 Yeas, to 25 Nays — the Nays all Whigs. The measure, as thus amended, passed the Senate by Yeas 27--all the Democrats present and three Whigs, of whom two thereupon turned Democrats — to 25 Nays — all Whigs; On the final vote in the Senate, the Yeas--for the Proposition as amended — were as follows — the names in italics being those of Whigs: Messrs. Allen, Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Benton, Breese, Buchanan, Colquitt, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Haywood, Henderson, Huger, Johnson, Lewis, McDuffie, Merrick, Niles, Semple. Sevier, Sturgeon, Tappan, Walker, Woodbury--27. The Nays--against the proposed Annexation — were : Messrs. Archer, Barrow, Bates, Bayard, Berrien, Choate, Clayton, Crittenden, Dayton, Evans, Foster, Francis, huntington, Jarnagin, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Pearce, Phelps, Porter, Rives, Simmo
to be to devise measures for the restoration of peace to the country. On motion of Mr. Washburne, of Ill., this was laid on the table: Yeas 92; Nays 51. Mr. Wm. Allen (Dem.), of Ohio, moved that it be Resolved, That, whenever the States now in rebellion against the General Government shall cease their rebellion and becoman, Spaulding, Stevens, Benj. F. Thomas, Train, Van Horne, Verree, Wallace, Charles W. Walton, E. P. Walton, Wheeler, Albert S. White, and Windom--60. Nays--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, Joseph Baily, George H. Browne, Burnett, Calvert, Cox, Cravens, Crisfield, Crittenden, Diven, Dunlap, Dunn, English, Fouke, Grider, Haight, Hale, Hardssed. The bill being thus returned to the House, Mr. Vallandigham moved to strike out the above section, which was defeated by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, George H. Browne, Calvert, Cox, Crisfield, Jackson, Johnson, May, Noble, Pendleton, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth,
llowing is the story of private Doherty, of the New York Seventy-first, who escaped from Sudley Church in company with Capt. Allen, of the Massachusetts Eleventh, and private Waldorf, of the Wisconsin Second: About 4 o'clock on Sunday afternoontime of Mr. Doherty's escape. On Friday night, about five minutes before 10 o'clock, by a preconcerted arrangement, Capt. Allen and Messrs. Doherty and Waldorf--who had from the first been allowed a reasonable freedom of movement — approached the guard at the blacksmith's shop. I must not forget to mention that Mr. Waldorf was wounded in the arm, and that Capt. Allen had contrived to exchange his officer's uniform for that of a private, and that he successfully affected to be wounded also.nd partly by swimming, partly by wading, reached Long Island, 17 miles from Washington. Mr. Doherty assures me, and Capt. Allen will, I believe, cordially indorse his statement — that nothing could exceed the magnanimity of the Confederate office
charge passing into the shoulder of the horse. Finding that the shot had not taken effect, Martin clubbed his musket, and Lieut. Carruthers fired upon him again, and thinking his pistol exhausted, threw it into his face, inflicting a severe wound. Martin then wheeled and ran. The alarm was given by Lieut. Carruthers as soon as possible, and some of the guards who were behind at the time the affray took place, upon finding the condition of affairs, immediately started for dogs to follow the trail. Lieut. Carruthers hurried to town as rapidly as the condition of his horse would permit, and gave notice to the members of the company of what had transpired, and in half an hour Capt. Ryan had forty or fifty men in pursuit. Martin was followed until daybreak next morning, but escaped. It seems that he obtained a horse from a negro of William Allen, and thus evaded his pursuers. The negro states that he was bleeding freely when he saw him, and that he was evidently severely wounded.
An incident of the great Bethel fight.--Orderly Sergeant Goodfellow, of Col. Allen's regiment, was mortally wounded in the breast. He handed his musket to a comrade, and several flocked around him. Oh, said he, I guess I've got to go, and he placed his hand upon the wound. Oh, don't mind me, boys, he continued; go on with the fight; don't stop for me! and pressing away those who attempted to support him, he sank down upon the ground. Just at that instant his colonel passed, and looking uveral flocked around him. Oh, said he, I guess I've got to go, and he placed his hand upon the wound. Oh, don't mind me, boys, he continued; go on with the fight; don't stop for me! and pressing away those who attempted to support him, he sank down upon the ground. Just at that instant his colonel passed, and looking up to him, he gasped, Good-bye, colonel! Col. Allen turned ghastly white as he observed it. He bit his lips, too much moved to speak, and rushed on to avenge his death.--Idem.
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.26 (search)
--twenty-three years ago. It is too early yet to say whether I shall like the House or not. If there is much behaviour like that of Dr. Tanner in it, I shall not; but it is ominous to me that the man can be permitted to behave so badly. William Allen, the Northumbrian, was a prominent figure among the Radicals, with his American felt hat, and loud grey suit. He is certainly a massive fellow; and I am half-inclined to think that he is rather vain, under all that Radical affectation of unky placed for observation, and sufficiently distant from the Radicals. Who is that gentleman opposite to me, next to John Ellis, second in support of Speaker Gully yesterday? -- That is Farquharson, of Aberdeen. That light-haired young man is Allen, of Newcastle. The gentleman on the upper bench is Sir E. Gourley, of Sunderland; and the one opposite, on the other bench, is Herbert Gladstone. But it is unnecessary to go further, you will understand his method. He pointed out quite two-sco
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