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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Masters A. Allen or search for Masters A. Allen in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
h a weight of metal been exchanged. The Hartford, in trying to avoid a fire-raft pushed by the Confederate tug Mosher, had grounded; and the little steamer, which was under command of a river captain named Horace Sherman, succeeded in lodging the huge torch along-side. Farragut, from the quarter-deck, immediately took control of the situation. Streams of water were turned on the flames that were leaping up the ship's sides and rigging; she appeared to be all ablaze, but at last Master's Mate Allen, who was in charge of the ship's fire brigade, succeeded in getting the flames under control, and by the time the flagship had worked off the bank and headed up the stream they were extinguished. The dauntless little Mosher received a broadside at close range and had sunk with all on board. It was an awe-inspiring sight. From the mortar batteries stationed down the stream the great shells rose in criss-cross fiery trails above the battle-smoke. The continuous cannonading from the for
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
pennant of Admiral Samuel F. Du Pont. December, 1861. December 4, 1861. Proclamation of Gen. Phelps, attached to Gen. Butler's expedition, on occupation of Ship Island, Mississippi Sound. December 17, 1861. Entrance to the harbor at Savannah, Ga., blocked by sinking 7 vessels laden with stone. December 20, 1861. The main ship-channel at Charleston Harbor was obstructed by sinking 16 vessels of the Stone fleet. December 31, 1861. Two boats under Acting-Masters A. Allen and H. L. Sturges, from the U. S. S. Mount Vernon, destroyed a light-ship off Wilmington, N. C., which the Confederates had fitted up for a gunboat. Capture of the town of Biloxi, Miss., by U. S. gunboats Lewis, Water Witch, and New London, with Federal forces from Ship Island. January, 1862. January 1, 1862. Confed. Commissioners Mason and Slidell left Boston for England via Provincetown, Mass., where the British war steamer Rinaldo received them. January 12, 1862.