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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 21 5 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 7 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for William Allen or search for William Allen in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
ects of their solicitude. But a few, comparatively, survive the lapse of years intervening since the great contest ended. Appended is a partial list, so far as can be recalled, of this famous and useful organization. Those who live deserve, as they receive, the gratitude of all surviving veterans, while the good deeds of those passed away are wreathed in memory that blooms sweetly and blossoms in the dust: 8 Members. Apperson, James L. Archer, Robert S. Ainslie, George A. Allen, Charles W. Burrows, Rev. J. L. Burress, James E. Beville, Wm. J. Bates, Charles Barney, Dr. C. G. Bailey, Samuel M. Cabell, Dr. J. G. Dooley, John Dudley, Thomas U. Doswell, Thomas W. Dibrell, R. H. Enders, John Exall, Henry Ellett, Andrew L. Eacho, Edward D. Edmond, Robert Ellyson, Moses Frayser, Lewis H. Glazebrook, L. W. Gatewood, Robert Goddin, Wellington Hobson, Julius A. Hackett, James H. Harrison, Samuel J. Ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
etreat from Richmond, and the fight at Sailor's Creek. This has put me in a reminiscent mood, and I would like to give, for your Confederate column, some of my recollections of those stirring times, more especially of the retreat from Richmond, and the participation of my command in the battle of Sailor's Creek. During the winter of 1864-65, my battalion, the 10th Virginia Artillery, was stationed immediately in front of Fort Harrison. The battalion had formerly been commanded by Major William Allen, of Claremont, but at that time by Major J. O. Hensley, of Bedford county. It was composed of five companies—Companies A and C, from Richmond, commanded respectively by Captains J. W. Barlow and Thomas P. Wilkinson; Company B, from Bedford county, Captain Robert B. Clayton; Company D, from Prince George, Captain C. Shirley Harrison, of Brandon; and Company E, from Henrico, Captain Thomas Ballard Blake. Lieutenant Sam Wilson, was Adjutant. The 10th Virginia and the 19th Virginia Ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
im, and many who admired his soldierly bearing. Leaving for the present our lines on the right, where Huger and Magruder are forming for the attack, we see that General Jackson has reached the creek near the Parsonage, on the Willis Church road and Quaker road (the Federal map Quaker road) about noon. General D. H. Hill, in the Century Series, says: At Willis Church I met General Lee. He bore grandly his terrible disappointment of the day before, and made no allusion to it. I gave him Mr. Allen's description of Malvern Hill, and presumed to say: If General McClellan is there in force we had better let him alone. Longstreet laughed and said: Don't get scared now that you have got him whipped. A little later, after describing the action of his five brigades, he relates an incident illustrating the power of the Federal rifled artillery, and I expect many an old soldier in this audience could duplicate it: I saw an artilleryman seated comfortably behind a very large tree, and appa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
dar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot where this gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysburg. Edwards, Thomas, died in hospital. Flippen, Charles, killed at Kernstown. Flippen, J. T., wounded at Chancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died since the war. King, George H., was the last man killed at Gettysburg in his company, a few yards from the enemy's line. Merryman, James, died soon after the war. Mahr,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
umber of the members on the morning of April 2, 1865, where the Confederate line was first broken, near the P. and W. railroad, there were only about forty of the company in the surrender. List of members. W. P. Alexander, James G. Allen, William Allen, B. F. Barnett, Hugh S. Beard, William Bartley, John Bowman, M. B. Campbell, James A. Campbell, W. A. Campbell, Sr., W. A. Campbell, Jr., N. M. Campbell, W. H. Cash, William Cash, J. V. Cash, John Cash, B. D. Cash, Joseph Cash, James P. Cash, P. Risk, wounded at Bristoe Station, October 14, 1863; James B. Culton, wounded at Bristoe Station, October 14, 1865; A. J. Griffin, wounded at Alleghany Mountain, December 12, 1861; ——Gaylor, Cross Keys, June 8. 1862. Died from Sickness—William Allen, Joseph Cash, John Cash, William Cash, and Marvel Coffey, at Staunton in 1861; Eugene Durham, 1864; James Goolsby, 1861; Thomas Gordon, 1861; W. L. Hamilton, Petersburg, in 1865; John F. Hamilton, in prison, 1864; Ed. N. Heizer, at Charlottes<