Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for R. A. Alston or search for R. A. Alston in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Exchange of prisoners. (search)
ties of felon life. It taxes credulity too much to believe that the United States were not responsible for the treatment they received, sent there as they were by General Burnside, and kept there by the United States War Department. While on the subject of Morgan's command, it may not be inappropriate to relate an incident which furnishes a dark chapter in the history of paroles, and serves to show the times upon which the country had then fallen My authority is a letter from Lieutenant Colonel Alston, of Morgan's command, to the Confederate Secretary of War. On the 5th of July, 1863, General Morgan captured the command of Lieutenant Colonel Charles H. Hanson, at Lebanon, Kentucky. The latter requested that he and his command be paroled, pledging his personal honor that he not only would observe it, but would see that every other one to whom the privilege was extended should observe it; and further, that if he should be ordered back into service, he would report to General Mor
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
oyed to stem the torrent of Grant's advance until the infantry could be marched around to his front. During these engagements the Black Horse lost heavily in killed, wounded, and prisoners. Among the latter was a young Englishman by the name of Alston, who had crossed the sea to join this command. He was as gallant, in army phrase, as they make them, and true to the cause for which, he had staked his life. While in prison his friends in England sought to procure his release, and the Federal authorities were willing to set him at liberty upon condition of his returning home and taking no further part in the war. But Alston would not consent to be separated from his comrades. He was, in due course of time, exchanged, but died in Richmond before he could rejoin his command. On Sunday, May 8th, the Southern cavalry were driven back to a position near Spottsylvania Court-House, where they formed a thin screen, behind which the infantry was concealed. The enemy advanced in full con
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio Railroad. (search)
or acts for a basis, makes blundering inexcusable in matters which are either of record or easily verified as to all their details by living witnesses. Colonel R. A. Alston, chief of Morgan's staff, was captured on the evening of the 5th of July, on the road from Lebanon to Bardstown, together with an escort of twenty men, by Lieutenant Ladd, of the Ninth Michigan Cavalry, and seven men. Alston and his escort were riding some distance in Morgan's rear. Ladd, who was scouting, came upon them just after dark. He concealed himself in the bushes at the roadside, and, by various devices, completely fooled the Confederates as to the size of his force until he had them disarmed. Alston, who was a brave officer, was terribly chagrined, but, on his word of honor, he took his men to Lexington, the nearest military post, and surrendered the next day. Major Dan McCook, paymaster, a gentleman probably sixty-five years old, but hale and much younger in appearance, accompanied General