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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
avely inform them that he had 2,000. Locating the detachments promiscuously, he would have the main column and detached squadrons marching in directions contrary to their objective points. Leaving Springfield, Morgan deflected from the straight northward route, hitherto pursued, and marched westward to Bardstown, threatening Louisville. By this time the rough riders had become weary and sleepy. While the column was making the night march from Springfield to Bardstown, the brilliant Colonel Alston, Chief of Staff, sought nature's sweet restorer on the veranda of a roadside residence, and awoke to find himself in the hands of the pursuing Federal cavalry. From Bardstown the Confederates marched rapidly to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River, forty miles below Louisville. Crossing the River. When the column reached Brandenburg, early in the morning of July 8, General Morgan was delighted to find two good steamboats lying at the wharf, the transports having been secured by two of