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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 539 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 88 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 58 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 54 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 54 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 39 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 38 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Americans or search for Americans in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

not permitted to take them from the office. "Order truly reigns in Warsaw. Yours respectfully, Sept. 1, 1861. The New York day Book. The proprietors of the New York Day Book have addressed a letter to the Courier des Etats Unis, denying that they have abandoned the position they have hitherto maintained. "The Day Book," they say "has neither interrupted its publication, nor by word or deed taken a position different from what it has preserved up to this moment. As Americans and freemen, its editors are determined to sustain the dignity of the press or perish in its defence." "our situation." Under the above caption the New York National Zeitung (German) thus writes: While the South is from day to day succeeding in throwing off the yoke of military despotism, we at the North have to suffer more from day to day by the iron grasp of the Dictator. --Terrorism against all who do not bear allegiance to the usurper, becomes more rampant every day. Sys
ed whom it were delusion to consider as an army. Mr. Davis saw the mischief long ago, and, by special act of Congress of the Confederate States at Montgomery, he seized the power of appointing officers. Discipline. It is hard to teach Americans discipline.--Their regular army has been for the most part composed of Germans and Irish. The people are averse to obedience in principle. Yesterday evening, as I was riding through Georgetown, I saw an officer "fall in" his men to go on somenot see how, out of the present conflict. I am not quite certain that the silence which has obtained in Europe in reference to the conflict will not soon be resented as an impertinence and an insulting affectation of indifference to that which Americans regard as the greatest contest that the world has ever seen. No one can be honestly indifferent to the results, for they must affect Europe just as any great disturbance in any State must produce an impression on the rest of the world. It is