Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Ames or search for Ames in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
0 5th CorpsBarnesTilton, Sweitzer, Vincent SykesAyresDay, Burbank, Weed 12,211CrawfordMcCandless, Fisher526 6th CorpsWrightTorbert, Bartlett, Russell SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill 15,710NewtonShaler, Eustis, Wheaton848 11th CorpsBarlowVon Gilsa, Ames HowardSteinwehrCoster, Smith 10,576SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski526 12th CorpsWilliamsMcDougall, Lockwood, Ruger Slocum 8,597GearyCandy, Cobham, Greene420 2,568TylerArtillery Reserve21110 corps STRENGTHDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY 2,rdered to proceed. In the afternoon, Lee himself left Fredericksburg for Culpeper. Hill's corps now stood alone in front of Hooker's entire army. Meanwhile, Hooker had sent Buford's and Gregg's divisions of cavalry, supported by Russell's and Ames's brigades of infantry, to attack Stuart's camps near the Rappahannock. A severe cavalry battle resulted on the 9th, near Brandy Station. The enemy's attack was a surprise, and the isolated Confederate brigades, first encountered, were so roughl
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
rds were suffered in this charge. Howard's report gives the story from the Federal side:— The attack was so sudden and violent that the infantry in front of Ames was giving way. In fact, at one moment the enemy had gotten within the batteries. A request for assistance had already gone to headquarters, so that promptly a brigade of the 2d corps under Col. Carroll moved to Ames's right, deployed, and went into position just in time to check the enemy's advance. At Wiedrich's battery, Gen. Ames, by extraordinary exertions, arrested a panic, and the men with sponge staffs and bayonets forced the enemy back. At this time he received support from Gen. Gen. Ames, by extraordinary exertions, arrested a panic, and the men with sponge staffs and bayonets forced the enemy back. At this time he received support from Gen. Schurz. Effective assistance was also rendered at this time by a portion of Gen. Steinwehr's command at points where the enemy was breaking through. This furious onset was met and withstood at every point, and lasted less than an hour. It only remains to show why Rodes failed to cooperate with Early and Johnson as Ewell had o
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
sent Bragg to command it, who made no effort to prevent the enemy's landing. It might have been difficult to prevent him, but to make no effort brought complaint and discouragement. The bombardment was, on this occasion, kept up without intermission day or night, and, instead of being general, was concentrated upon the land defences. On the afternoon of the second day, the palisades and guns of those defences being destroyed and a breach opened, two assaults were made about 3 P. M., one by Ames's division of the 23d corps, about 4500 strong, and one by 2000 sailors and marines from the fleet under Capt. Breese. The latter assaulted the breach, but were repulsed with severe loss. The infantry, passing around and through the palisades, made a lodgment between the traverses, and after seven hours fighting possessed the fort. When Bragg took command of the land forces, Whiting, who had commanded the whole post before, took command of the fort. He was mortally, and Col. Lamb desperat