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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Charles Gordon Ames or search for Charles Gordon Ames in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
Our mother was never ordained: it is doubtful whether she ever contemplated such a step; but she felt herself consecrated to the work; wherever she was asked to preach, she went as if on wings, feeling this call more sacred than any other. She preached in all parts of the country, from Maine to California, from Minnesota to Louisiana; but the pulpit in which she felt most truly at home was that of the Church of the Disciples. Mr. Clarke had first welcomed her there: his successor, Charles Gordon Ames, became in turn her valued friend and pastor. The congregation were all her friends. On Sundays they gathered round her after service, with greetings and kind words. She was ready enough to respond. Congregationing, as she called this little function, was her delight; after listening devoutly to the sermon, there was always a reaction to her gayest mood. Her spirit came to church with folded hands of prayer, but departed on dancing feet. Sometimes she reproached herself with o
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
elled on a similar society which, with Free Russia as its organ, was doing good work in England. The object of the American society was to aid by all moral and legal means the Russian patriots in their efforts to obtain for their country political freedom and self-government. Its circular was signed by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Julia Ward Howe, John Greenleaf Whittier, James Russell Lowell, George Kennan, William Lloyd Garrison, Henry I. Bowditch, F. W. Bird, Alice Freeman Palmer, Charles G. Ames, Edward L. Pierce, Frank B. Sanborn, Annie Fields, E. Benjamin Andrews, Lillie B. Chace Wyman, Samuel L. Clemens, and Joseph H. Twitchell. James Russell Lowell, writing to Francis J. Garrison in 1891, says: Between mote and beam, I think this time Russia has the latter in her eye, though God knows we have motes enough in ours. So you may take my name even if it be in vain, as I think it will be. It was through this society that she made the acquaintance of Mme. Breschkovskaya,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
wishes me to say what I thought would be the result of the women's edition fad. I said that one result would be to drive to desperation those who receive letters, asking contributions to these issues. February 9. Another inspired sermon from C. G. Ames. Miss Page asked, Why is he so earnest? What does it mean? I replied, He is in one of those waves of inspiration which come sometimes. The angel has certainly troubled the pool and we can go to it for healing. Returning home, I wrote some resent. Sarah Whitman, Lizzie Agassiz, Mrs. Cornelius Felton, Mrs. Fields, Mrs. Whitney, besides our Committee and Mrs. Barrows. M. Anagnos gave us the band of the Institution, which was a great help. They played several times. I introduced C. G. Ames, who made a prayer. My opening address followed. Mmes. Livermore and Woolson, and Anagnos made the most important addresses. As the band played America, a young Greek came in, bearing the Greek flag, which had quite a dramatic effect. The m
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
e and introduced me as the youngest person in the hall, I said, ladies and gentlemen, I shall prove the truth of what our reverend friend has just said, by citing a quotation from mother Goose [ when the pie was opened, etc.], and the first bird that I shall introduce will be Rev. E. E. Hale. beginning thus, I introduced T. W. Higginson as the great American Eagle; Judge [Robert] Grant as a mocking-bird; C. F. Adams as the trained German canary who sings all the songs of Yawcob Strauss; C. G. Ames said, you must n't call me an owl. I brought him forward and said, my dear minister says that I must not call him an owl, and I will not; only the owl is the bird of wisdom and he is very wise. I introduced Mrs. Moulton as a nightingale. For Trowbridge I could think of nothing and said, this bird will speak for himself. introduced N. H. Dole as a bird rarely seen, the phoenix. at the close E. E. H. Said, you have an admirable power of introducing. this little device pleased me foolis
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
elt it before. June 16. Maud would not allow me to attend Quincy Mansion School Commencement, to my sincere regret. The fatigue of yesterday was excessive, and my dear child knew that another such occasion would be likely to make me ill. Charles G. Ames came, from whom I first learned the death of Mrs. Cheney's sister, Mary Frank Littlehale; the funeral set for today.... Dear E. D. C. seemed gratified at seeing me and asked me to say a few words.... She thanked me very earnestly for what I d is indeed a sanctuary to which one might retire for refuge from all mean and unworthy things. A luminous intellect, unusual powers of judgment and of sympathy as well. She has been a tower of strength to me. I sent word by telephone to Charles G. Ames, begging that her hymn might be sung at church to-morrow .... November 21. Dear E. D. C.'s funeral. ... I spoke of her faith in immortality, which I remember as unwavering. I said: No, that lustrous soul is not gone down into darkness.
Arts and Letters, II, 399. American Academy of Science, I, 251, 259. American Authors, Society of, II, 355. American Branch, International Peace Society, I, 306. American Civil War, I, 176, 186, 219-22; II, 253. American Institute of Education, II, 68. American Notes, I, 81. American Peace Society, I, 303. American Revolution, I, 6. American School of Archaeology, Athens, II, 243. American Woman Suffrage Association, I, 365. Ames, Mr., II, 166, 167. Ames, Charles Gordon, I, 392; II, 187, 193, 216, 229, 273, 280, 287, 288, 298, 324, 328, 358, 361. Ames, Fanny, II, 297. Ames, Mrs., Sheldon, II, 22. Amsterdam, II, 11. Anacreon, I, 289. Anagnos, Julia R., I, 96, 104, 106, 114, 115, 116, 119, 122, 126, 128, 133, 159-63, 172, 181, 216, 249-51, 264, 265, 267, 297, 349, 350, 352; II, 46, 59, 65, 70, 73, 74, 115-20, 123, 127, 128, 129, 164, 349. Anagnos, Michael, I, 273, 281, 288-90, 297, 331, 332; II, 116-18, 129, 228, 229, 293, 300, 347, 3