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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for H. N. Ames or search for H. N. Ames in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
ylee, M. O. Stimson and Wm. Lannan. Steamer Crusader Acting-Master, Thomas Andrews; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. A. Arnold; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, T. McC. Brower; Acting-Ensigns, G. W. Nelson, T. W. Sheer and T. S. Smythe; Acting-Master's Mates, Albert Buhner, Henry Parsons and E. D. Edmunds; Engineers: Acting Second-Assistant, P. O. Brightman; Acting-Third-Assistants, S. T. Strude and W. T. Waterman. Sloop Granite. Acting-Master, E. Boomer. Schooner Wm. Bacon. Acting-Master, Wm. P. Rogers; Acting-Master's Mates, C. D. Thompson, H. E. Ripley and Daniel McLaughlin. Ship Charles Phelps. Acting-Master, Wm. F. North. Ship Ben Morgan. Acting-Master, Wm. Shankland. Steamer Zouave. Pilot, John A. Phillips; Acting-Master's Mate, P. B. Doran; Acting-Third-Assistant Engineer, H. N. Ames. Tug Cohasset. Pilot, Thomas Eveans; Acting-Master's Mate, J. F. Doggett; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Sydney Smith; Acting-Third-Assistant, Charles Robinson.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
went down to silence the batteries, demoralize the men in the forts, so that the Army could easily assault the works. It would be a matter of no consequence whether this was done on the 18th or the 25th, as long as we did our share of the work effectively, which, I believe, no one denies. If the Army after landing on the 25th would not undertake the assault, they would not have done so on the 18th. The delay, if any, gave them 1,000 men more, a large steamer and another transport under General Ames having come in on that day. When General Butler was about to start from Fortress Monroe (having embarked his men in a storm, when I told him he could not possibly leave for three days), I requested him to wait a day after I sailed, as my vessels were slow, and I would have to fill up the powder-vessel; but finding that the Monitors were going, he started off for the rendezvous he had established himself, showed himself and some of the transports to the enemy, was fired at by the forts,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
federates all mixed up together. It was a sickening sight and took away much of the pleasure of the victory; but soldiers and sailors grew accustomed to such things during the war, and the active work still before them, ere they could reach Wilmington and secure the railroad leading to Richmond, soon drove the dreadful spectacle from their minds. Regarding the gallant soldiers, who so nobly fought their way over the bomb-proofs, too much cannot be said in their praise. Terry, their leader, Ames, Curtis, Lawrence, and Pennypacker, should never be forgotten; while those in the Navy, who fought their ships so well and so persistently, will, in future years, be remembered and honored as were the heroes of 1812. when our infant Navy showed the mistress of the seas that she would one day have to divide her honors with the young Republic. A number of the 100-pounder Parrott rifles burst while in action, and the commanders and men, having lost confidence in them, they were no longer use
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
the batteries above the forts were reported silenced, and a detachment of about 2,300 men of General Ames' command was landed two and a half miles north of the fort [without a gun being fired on themault. Curtis was now within fifty yards of the fort [not a shot fired at him] and sent word to Ames that he could take the work, whereupon Ames sent orders for an assault. Curtis at once moved forAmes sent orders for an assault. Curtis at once moved forward, but by the time he reached his position night had come on, and the fleet had nearly ceased to fire; [and yet, Ames and Curtis, under Terry, assaulted, and continued to assault, Fort Fisher untilAmes and Curtis, under Terry, assaulted, and continued to assault, Fort Fisher until it was taken at night]. Some of the rebel troops who had been driven to their bomb-proofs returned to their guns [which they could not fire as the guns were disdisabled]. At this juncture the ordor four traverses which protected them from the fire of the enemy, and there Curtis held on until Ames and Pennypacker could obtain a secure footing in the fort with him. Bell's brigade was brought up