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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
re sometimes captured, and bass were often caught with hook and line. At the parting of Mystic Ponds, fish were caught by seines where the dam is now. There were a few beaches where seines were set for catching alewives; wagon loads of these were often taken, salted, and shipped south. A few shad were captured in this way. Joseph and Milton James, before 1845, had a lumber yard on Main street, at the southwest corner of the bridge. Mr. Joseph James lived just south of the yard, where Ames' paint shop, No. 49 Main street, stands. About 1845, the Messrs. James sold their property here and removed their business to the Branch Canal, near Swan street. Parallel with Main street was an inclined way leading from the lumber yard to the river at the bridge, which was used as a boat landing and for hauling timber from the river. Some of the very earliest deeds refer to this landing, which was public property before that part of Medford south of Mystic river was set off from the t
e made. He was so closely associated with the founding of the society and with its whole active life that all recognize his devotion to the ideals for which the society stands. Thus has passed a life noble and unselfish, progressive without ostentation, loving and loved, to its close. Life's race well run, Life's work all done, Life's victory won, Now cometh rest. Principals of Medford High School, 1835-1903. Charles Mason, 1835; Luther Farrar, 1835–'36; Daniel Forbes, 1836–'41; Isaac Ames, 1841–'44; M. T. Gardner, 1844; Edwin Wright, 1844–'45; James Waldock, 1845–'46; Charles Cummings, 1846–‘76; Lorin L. Dame, 1876-1903; Leonard J. Manning, 1903. Errata. Vol. 6, last five lines p. 17, and first two lines p. 18 should read: Mr. [Benjamin] Moore, in company with John Fall, a shipsmith, and J. T. Barker, a teamster, took the business of Alexander Gregg (see vol. 5, p. 93) after his death. Mr. Moore was killed by being caught between two cars while unloading freig