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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 53 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 21 3 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
y. The number in view was not large, but the gunners were already abandoning their pieces, when Ammen's brigade, accompanied by Nelson, came into action. The attack was repelled, and the engagementing near the head of the Landing road, General Grant came up from the river, closely followed by Ammen's brigade of Nelson's division. Information of the expected attack was promptly given, and two of Ammen's regiments deployed into line, moved rapidly forward, and after a few sharp exchanges of volleys from them, the enemy fell back, and the bloody series of engagements of Sunday at Pittsburg repulse. The reports of all the officers who took part in the action at the landing, Nelson, Ammen, and the regimental commanders, fully sustain the main point in these accounts, and are totally ng off his troops for the night. The attack was poorly organized, but it was not repelled until Ammen arrived, and it cannot be affirmed under the circumstances that the action of his brigade in del
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
pproaches were bad from that direction; nevertheless, they attacked resolutely, and, though repeatedly repulsed, kept up their assaults till nightfall. At one time they drove some gunners from their guns, and their attack has been generally mistaken by Federal writers for the final assault of the Confederate army--which was never made. The Federal generals and writers attribute their salvation to the repulse of Chalmers, and the honor is claimed respectively for Webster's artillery and for Ammen's brigade of Buell's army, which came up at the last moment. But neither they nor all that was left of the Federal army could have withstood five minutes the united advance of the Confederate line, which was at hand and ready to deal the death-stroke. Their salvation came from a different quarter. Bragg, in his monograph written for the use of the writer in preparing the Life of A. S. Johnston, gives the following account of the close of the battle: Concurring testimony, especially that o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The March of Lew Wallace's division to Shiloh. (search)
who studied the route in 1884, estimates it at between 13 and 14 miles. Not considering the comparative difficulties of the two marches, the map indicates little difference in the speed of Wallace's division and that of Nelson's leading brigade (Ammen) from Savannah to Pittsburg Landing (1:30 to 5). Ammen in his diary dwells on the extreme difficulties of his route, which lay largely through swamps impassable by artillery. Documents submitted by General Wallace. I. Letter found on theAmmen in his diary dwells on the extreme difficulties of his route, which lay largely through swamps impassable by artillery. Documents submitted by General Wallace. I. Letter found on the person of General W. H. L. Wallace, after he had received a mortal wound at Shiloh, and sent by his widow to General Grant [see foot-note, page 468; printed also in the Century and in the Personal memoirs of U. S. Grant ]: Headquarters, Third Division, Adamsville, April 5th, 1862. General W. H. L. Wallace, commanding Second Division. Sir: Yours received. Glad to hear from you. My cavalry from this point has been to and from your post frequently. As my Third Brigade is here, five miles fr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
notwithstanding that my presence throughout our operations, in command of the gun-boat Seneca, gave me an intelligent personal view of the whole subject.-D. A. Daniel Ammen, Rear-Admiral, U. S. N. After the inauguration of Mr. Lincoln as President of the United States, in March, 1861, a painful lethargy seemed to pervade every the actual losses from the gale, that became known to us some days later. The Isaac Smith was disabled and her commander forced Union gun-boat Seneca, Captain Daniel Ammen's vessel at Port Royal. From a war-time sketch. to throw his battery overboard, with the exception of one 30-pounder rifle, to enable him to go to the asstenant Commanding J. W. A. Nicholson. The flanking squadron was led by the gun-boat Bienville, Commander Charles Steedman, followed by the Seneca, Lieutenant Commanding Daniel Ammen; gun-boat Curlew, Lieutenant Commanding P. G. Watmough; gun-boat Penguin, Lieutenant Commanding T. A. Budd; and the gun-boat Augusta, Commander E. G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Port Royal, November 7th, 1861. (search)
nch, 28 9-inch, 14 8-inch, 2 12-pounders), Commander C. R. P. Rodgers; sidewheel steamer Susquehanna (15 8-inch, 1 24-pounder, 2 12-pounders), Captain J. L. Lardner; sloop Mohican (2 11-inch, 4 32-pounders, I 12-pounder), Commander S. W. Godon; Seminole (1 11-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander J. P. Gillis; Pocahontas (1 10-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander Percival Drayton; Pawnee (8 9-inch, 2 12-pounders), Lieutenant R. H. Wyman; gun-boats Unadilla, Lieutenant Napoleon Collins; Seneca, Lieutenant Daniel Ammen; Ottawa, Lieutenant T. H. Stevens; Pembina, Lieutenant J. P. Bankhead (each of the four latter carried 1 11-inch, 1 20-pounder rifle, and 2 24-pounders); sailing sloop Vandalia (4 8-inch, 16 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder), Commander F. S. Haggerty; steamer Bienville (8 32--pounders, 1 30-pounder rifle), Commander Charles Steedman; Augusta (8 32-pounders, I 12-pounder), Commander E. G. Parrott; Curlew (6 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder rifle), Lieutenant P. G. Watmough; Penguin (4 32-pounders,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
e available for the great work he had so much at heart. Percival Drayton, John Rodgers, Worden, Ammen, George Rodgers, Fairfax, Downes, and Rhind were chosen for the turret ships, and Commodore Thomannels, Admiral Du Pont sent Captain Drayton with the Passaic, accompanied by the Patapsco, Commander Ammen, and the Nahant, Commander Downes, to try the batteries of these three monitors against Fors; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner; Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; Nantuckehief-of-staff, by John Worden, of monitor fame, and by that grim, true-hearted, fighting man, Daniel Ammen. These, all turning short of the obstructions, threw the vessels following into some confusiour success with all other means combined. The five iron-clads sent you are all the Rear-Admiral Daniel Ammen. From a photograph. department has completed on the Atlantic coast, with the excepti
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
au, Lieut.-Com. J. H. Upshur, 1 30-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 20-pounder Parrott pivot, 2 12-pounder heavy howitzers; Stettin, Act. Master C. J. Van Alstine, 1 30-pounder Parrott pivot, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers; Uncas, Act. Master William Watson, 4 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder Parrott; Memphis, Lieut.-Com. P. G. Watmough, Act. Master C. A. Curtis, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 1 30-pounder Parrott rifle, 2 12-pounder rifle howitzers. Monitors. (1 15-inch, 1 11-inch, each.) Patapsco, Com. D. Ammen; Passaic, Captain P. Drayton; Nahant, Com. John Downes; Montauk, Com. John L. Worden, Com. D. M. Fairfax; Nantucket, Com. D. M. Fairfax, Lieut.-Com. L. H. Newman, Com. J. C. Beaumont; Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers; Catskill, Com. George W. Rodgers. Other iron-clads. Keokuk, Com. A. C. Rhind, 2 11-inch. S. B.; New Ironsides, Com. T. Turner, 14 11-inch, 2 150-pounder Parrotts, 2 50-pounder Dahlgrens. Sailing vessels (Barks). Kingfisher, Act. Master J. C. Dutch, 4 8-inch; Braz
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
); Lieut.-Com. A. W. Weaver (2d attack). Monadnock, Com. E. G. Parrott. New Ironsides, Commo. William Radford. Saugus, Com. E. R. Colhoun. Screw frigates. Colorado, Commo. H. K. Thatcher. Minnesota, Commo. Joseph Lanman. Wabash, Capt. M. Smith. Side-wheel steamers (1st class). Powhatan, Commo. J. F. Schenck. Susquehanna, Commo. S. W. Godon. Screw sloops. Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden. Juniata, Capt. W. R. Taylor (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. T. S. Phelps (2d attack). Mohican, Com. D. Ammen. Shenandoah, Capt. D. B. Ridgely. Ticonderoga, Capt. C. Steedman. Tuscarora, Com. J. M. Frailey. Screw gun-vessels. Kansas, Lieut.-Com. P. G. Watmough. Maumee, Lieut.-Com. R. Chandler. Nyack, Lieut.-Com. L. H. Newman. Pequot, Lieut.-Com. D. L. Braine. Yantic, Lieut.-Com. T. C. Harris. Screw gun-boats. Chippewa, Lieut.-Com. A. W. Weaver (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. E. E. Potter (2d attack). Huron, Lieut.-Com. T. O. Selfridge. Seneca, Lieut.-Com. M. Sicard. Unadilla, Lieut.-Com. F
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
ed of the Wabash, Commander C. R. P. Rogers, leading; frigate Susquehlanna, Captain J. L. Lardner; sloop Mohican, Commander L W. Gordon; sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant commanding T. H. Stevens; gunboat Pembina, Lieutenant commanding J. P. Bankhead; sailing sloop Vandalia, towed by the Isaac P. Smith, Lieutenant commanding J. W. A. Nicholson. The flanking squadron consisted of the gunboats Bienville, Commander Charles Steedman, leading; Seneca, Lieutenant commanding Daniel Ammen; Curlew, Lieutenant commanding P. G. Watmough; Penguin, Lieutenant commanding F. A. Budd; and Augusta, Commander E. G. Parrott. Fort Walker, Hilton head. That flotilla was then lying at a safe distance between Hilton Head and Paris Islands. The plan of attack was to pass up midway between Forts Walker and Beauregard (which were about two miles apart), receiving and returning the fire of both; and at the distance of two and a half miles northward of the latter, round b
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
establishment, represented in the annexed engraving, was set up by W. B. Coggswell, the master mechanic. each was sent quietly to that point, where they were all assembled, to the number of fourteen, The vessels consisted of nine monitors and five armored gun-boats. Floating machine-shop. The names of the monitors and their respective commanders were as follows: Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers; Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; Montauk, Commander John L. Worden; Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; New Ironsides, Commander Thomas Turner; Cattskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; Nantucket, Commander Donald M. Fairfax; Nahant, Commander John Downes, and Keokuk, Lieutenant-Commander Alexander C. Rhind. The gun-boats were the Canandaigua, Captain Joseph H. Green; Housatonic, Captain Wm. R. Taylor; Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commander S. P. Quackenbush; Wissahickon, Lieutenant-Commander J. G. Davis; Huron, Lieutenant-Commander G. A. Stevens. at the beginning of April. On the night of Su
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