Your search returned 58 results in 17 document sections:

1 2
oon Mr. Lincoln, accompanied by General McDowell, Gen. Patrick, and a body-guard, visited and rode through the streets of Fredericksburgh. The President was greeted by the troops and many of the citizens with the utmost enthusiasm. A National salute was fired by one of the batteries in Falmouth. The Presidential party returned late in the evening to Washington. A skirmish took place about five miles from Trenton Bridge, N. C., between a detachment of Union troops under command of Colonel Amory, consisting of twelve companies of cavalry, the Seventeenth and Twenty-fifth Massachusetts infantry, and a section of the Third New York artillery, and a body of rebels secreted in the woods along the roadside. After a fierce contest, which lasted only about ten minutes, the rebels were routed, leaving nine of their number dead on the field, among whom was Lieutenant Rogers, a favorite officer among them.--N. Y. Tribune. A soldier, belonging to Col. Catherwood's regiment, Sixth Mis
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
ford, North of him, Pope sent Colonel Jefferson C. Davis and Major Merrill to flank them, while the main body should be in a position to give immediate aid, if necessary. Davis found them in a wooded bottom on the west side of the Blackwater, opposite the mouth of Clear Creek. His forces were on the east side, and a bridge that spanned the Blackwater between them was strongly guarded. This was carried by assault, by two companies of the Fourth Regular Cavalry, under Lieutenants Gordon and Amory, supported by five companies of the First Iowa cavalry. Gordon led the charge in person, and received several balls through his cap. The Confederates were driven, the bridge was crossed, and a pursuit was pressed. Unable to, escape, the fugitives, commanded by Colonels Robinson, Alexander, and Magoffin (the latter a brother of the Governor of Kentucky), surrendered. The captives were one thousand three hundred in number, infantry and cavalry; and with them the Nationals gained as spoils a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
e marched inland toward Tarboroa, when, being informed that a force larger than his own was gathered there, he turned oceanward, and made his way to Plymouth, where his troops were embarked for New Berne. Little of importance was accomplished by this expedition, excepting the liberation of several hundred slaves. A little later Foster undertook a more important expedition with a larger force. His force consisted of the brigade of General Wessel, of Peck's division; the brigades of Colonels Amory, Stevenson, and Lee; the Third New York and First Rhode Island Batteries, with sections of the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth New York Independent Batteries; and the Third New York Cavalry. He set out from New Berne Dec. 11. for the purpose of striking and breaking up at Goldsboroa, the railway that connected Military operations in North Carolina. Richmond with the Carolinas, and then forming a junction with the National forces at Suffolk and Norfolk. He moved on without much hinder
being in advance, under the command respectively of Lieutenant Gordon and Lieutenant Amory, were designated for that service, and were supported by the five companiein camp at Milford, diverged to the left, and put the regular cavalry, under Lieut. Amory, in the advance, the four companies of the First Iowa Cavalry, under Major Ts the mill-dam. Finding it would be dangerous to charge the bridge mounted, Lieut. Amory ordered the men to dismount and skirmish with pistols and sabres, as infantry traversing its steep sides and muddy bottom for a mile, returned to find Lieutenant Amory charging across the bridge, the rebels having deserted it upon seeing Colonel Davis, with the artillery, advancing. Lieut. Amory followed the road, thinking that the rebels might flee to the north. Lieut. Gordon, immediately after him, da some minutes. The cavalry, under Major Torrence, and the regulars, under Lieut. Amory, had in the mean time gotten up in the flank and rear of another body of the
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
March, 1862. Foster's 1st Brigade, Burnside's Expeditionary Corps, to April, 1862. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to December, 1862. Amory's Brigade, Dept. of North Carolina, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to July, 1863. Defenses of New Berber 12 to October 23, 1862. Left State for Newberne, N. C., October 24. Attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to December, 1862. Amory's Brigade, Dept. North Carolina, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. North Carolina, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, Maryland Heir 30, 1862. Moved to Boston, thence to Newberne, N. C., November 25-30. Attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of North Carolina, to December, 1862. Amory's Brigade, Dept. North Carolina, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, Dept. of North Carolina, to June, 1863. 8th Army Corps, Middle
nterior of his flank-works, Stephenson, Anderson, and Spinola, and sweep the ground in form of the Cremaillere line, and also on the other side of the Trent, about Amory and Gaston. Upon calling his attention to the uncertain nature of the Naval defences, he assured me that he would send six army gunboats, and in a measure render pportunity of concentrating upon either line. Last summer the river was guarded by one or two gunboats, which afforded a measure of protection to the small works, Amory and Gaston, exposed to assault from their advanced positions. These works are located upon the high ground where the bank is bluff, permitting a flotilla of smallrs do not like to have their gunboats in the Trent. The absence of the naval element, and the expectation of an early attack, decided that a slight extension of Amory was imperatively demanded. Colonel Dutton, one of the most accomplished Engineers in the service, and of great experience, has looked after this work. It will co
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Fortifications and their Armaments. (search)
nterior of his flank-works, Stephenson, Anderson, and Spinola, and sweep the ground in form of the Cremaillere line, and also on the other side of the Trent, about Amory and Gaston. Upon calling his attention to the uncertain nature of the Naval defences, he assured me that he would send six army gunboats, and in a measure render pportunity of concentrating upon either line. Last summer the river was guarded by one or two gunboats, which afforded a measure of protection to the small works, Amory and Gaston, exposed to assault from their advanced positions. These works are located upon the high ground where the bank is bluff, permitting a flotilla of smallrs do not like to have their gunboats in the Trent. The absence of the naval element, and the expectation of an early attack, decided that a slight extension of Amory was imperatively demanded. Colonel Dutton, one of the most accomplished Engineers in the service, and of great experience, has looked after this work. It will co
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 25 (search)
annot execute the law. The Mayor said of the riots of 1860-61, We can't put them down. The reply of his own policemen was, Thirty of us will put them down, if you will allow us. The reply of the Abolitionist was, When did you ever make an effort to put them down? The only time you ever stood on Tremont Temple platform and issued an order, it was obeyed; the mob recognized you as their leader. But men say at the State-House, in reply to the eloquent argument of Mr. Ellis,--Mr. Healy, Alderman Amory, said, We cannot execute an unpopular law. Indeed! Indeed! I can remember when Marshal Tukey put a chain round your Court-House to execute a law that was hated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts full as bitterly as Beacon Street hates the Maine Liquor Law; and I can remember when he went up to a legislative committee appointed to examine into his conduct, and inquire why a policeman of the city of Boston was acting in that illegal manner, against the statute of the State, and answered
nitarian and Episcopalian. Its members were closely connected by intermarriage; and a personal difficulty with one was quickly taken up by the related families,—so that through connections by kin or friendship nearly all the society was likely to take a part. For instance, the Ticknor, Eliot, Dwight, Guild, and Norton families were connected by marriage; and Mr. Eliot was a near kinsman of the Curtis family. Similar ties by blood and marriage united the Sears, Mason, Warren, Parker, and Amory families, and also the Shaw, Sturgis, Parkman, and Perkins families. Another group was the Sturgis, Perkins, Cabot, Forbes, Cary, Gardiner, and Cushing families. The different groups were often connected by kin or close friendship. Sumner was for a time, at an earlier period, shut out from one house on Beacon Street merely for complimenting, in a lawyer's office, the editor of a magazine who had reviewed a domestic controversy already before the public in judicial proceedings. The head of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
is detected. He deceived half the North, but they are undeceived. He does not stand as he did six months ago. Adams's Biography of Dana. p. 286. The Compromise was promptly approved in a public letter to him, signed by several hundreds of the most conspicuous citizens, Boston Courier, April 3, 1850; Boston Advertiser, April 3. The last—named newspaper, by a slip of the pen, called the signers Mr. Webster's retainers.—among them merchants like Eliot, Perkins, Fearing, Appleton, Haven, Amory, Sturgis, Thayer, and Hooper; lawyers like Choate, Lunt, B. R. Curtis, and G. T. Curtis; physicians like Jackson and Bigelow; scholars like Ticknor, Everett, Prescott, Sparks, Holmes, and Felton; divines like Moses Stuart and Leonard Woods. Its passage was signalized by the firing of one hundred guns on the Common. Webster's partisans, such was their intensity of feeling, very soon obtained the mastery of the Whig organization of the city, and compelled dissenters to submit to the nomina
1 2