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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 17 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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k. We shall have occasion to speak again of this admirable institution and Colonel Howe in a subsequent chapter. Charles Amory, of Boston, who, in the early part of the war, had tendered to the Governor his services, free of charge, in any positer of ordnance, upon the discharge of General Stone, on the seventh day of October, 1861, with the rank of colonel. Colonel Amory performed the duties of the office until Jan. 9, 1863, when he resigned, there being no further necessity for his ser is associated, for presents of needle-books and handkerchiefs for the soldiers. May 24, 1861.—Governor writes to Lieutenant Amory, U. S. A., mustering officer at Boston, Whatever rations, clothing, &c., you may want for the soldiers, after they aing been elected three times to that responsible position. June 14.—Governor telegraphs to the Secretary of War, Lieutenant Amory, U. S. A., mustering officer in Boston, thinks we ought to furnish thirty wagons, instead of fifteen, for every thou
ered on an expedition up the Roanoke River, and LieutenantColo-nel Fellows promised to send the report home by mail. Colonel Amory, of this regiment, had been for some time acting as brigadier-general. Colonel Adams witnessed a review of the regimooked after every thing within his reach; and I was pleased at the high commendation he bestowed upon Colonels Stevenson, Amory, and Upton, in especial. I was the bearer of a recommendation from him to the Secretary of war, that Colonels Amory and Colonels Amory and Stevenson should be appointed brigadier-generals. He desired me to solicit your recommendation for them also. During the early part of the year 1862, three allotment commissioners were appointed by the President, as provided by acts of Congress, do it with more expedition and economy than it can be done otherwise. These letters were taken to Washington by Colonel Charles Amory, master of ordnance of Massachusetts. Jan. 18.—Colonel Browne, by direction of the Governor, writes to Henry N
ly proved; but the invention had been made at a time when there seemed to be no necessity of any such great strength in guns, and such as were already in use appeared sufficiently good. This invention had therefore been without result, though its principle was, in part at least, adopted in the Parrott gun in this country, and much more extensively by the celebrated foreign manufacturers, Sir William Armstrong and Captain Blakely. The Governor submitted to a commission composed of Colonel Charles Amory, Master of Ordnance. Lieutenant-Colonel Harrison Ritchie, his aide-de-camp, and two distinguished civil engineers, Messrs. J. W. Brooks and James B. Francis, the question of the ascertained or probable merits of the Treadwell gun, and its capacity to penetrate armor-plates, as also of the feasibility and advantage of an attempt to supply in part our deficiency in ordnance of its manufacture. The commission submitted an elaborate report. They were unanimously in favor of the gun,
igadier-General John H. Reed, Quartermaster-General. Brigadier-General William J. Dale, Surgeon-General. Brigadier-General Richard A. Peirce, Inspector-General. Brigadier-General William Raymond Lee, Chief Engineer. Brigadier-General William L. Burt, Judge-Advocate-General. Brigadier-General Elijah D. Brigham, Commissary-General. Colonel Joseph M. Day, Provost-Marshal-General. Colonel J. F. B. Marshall, Paymaster-General. Colonel William S. King, Constable of Commonwealth. Colonel Charles Amory, late Master of Ordnance. Lieutenant-Colonel Gardiner Tufts, Assistant Provost-Marshal-General, State agent at Washington, of Lynn, Essex County. Major William Rogers, assistant Adjutant-General. Major George C. Trumbull, late Acting Master of Ordnance. These nominations were confirmed. The war being over, Governor Andrew determined not again to be a candidate for Governor of Massachusetts. On the 13th of September, he addressed the following letter to William Claflin,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
d together. I do not visit the Ticknors now, and feel that our separation is growing broader every day. I have been true to them. Why, then, should I feel troubled? And yet friendship, sympathy, and kindness are a peculiar necessity of my nature, and I can have few losses greater than the weakening of these bonds. Sunday, May 15. Another night of sleep. I am a day older, with gray hairs shooting forth with startling growth. We dined at Prescott's at five o'clock,—William and Charles Amory, W. H. Gardiner, Dr. Robbins, and myself. There was a good deal of pleasant conversation. Mr. Webster arrived in town yesterday. I wish to see him about Fay, and to revive the old plan about Greene; but our public men are so lost in selfishness that I do not hope much. If I were a partisan in politics, I should speak as one having influence. We Hillard and himself. have read the proofs of Dr. Channing's second pamphlet. It is bold, vivid, and full of life-giving truths. I a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Sunday, May 15. (search)
Sunday, May 15. Another night of sleep. I am a day older, with gray hairs shooting forth with startling growth. We dined at Prescott's at five o'clock,—William and Charles Amory, W. H. Gardiner, Dr. Robbins, and myself. There was a good deal of pleasant conversation. Mr. Webster arrived in town yesterday. I wish to see him about Fay, and to revive the old plan about Greene; but our public men are so lost in selfishness that I do not hope much. If I were a partisan in politics, I should speak as one having influence. We Hillard and himself. have read the proofs of Dr. Channing's second pamphlet. It is bold, vivid, and full of life-giving truths. I admire the power of this man. Of all moral truth he has an instinctive perception, and clothes it in an angelic light. . . . So I close this rambling scrawl. What care you for these minutes and fragments of life here in Boston? You now look upon the Rhine and its castled glories. God bless you! my dear friend. Get