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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Jean J. Ampere or search for Jean J. Ampere in all documents.

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to enforce conformity in politics and arrest tendencies to radicalism, or to opinions or conduct which were contrary to the conventional standard. Men of courage who pushed moral principles into politics were stigmatized as fanatics and demagogues. A Frenchman visiting Boston in 1851 found that the mention of Sumner's name in social life made certain people shiver (frissonner), because he was a Free Soiler, and suspected of abolitionism, though otherwise nothing ill was said of him. J. J. Ampere's Promenade en Amerique;, vol. II. p. 36. Ampere, during his sojourn, was frequently at Ticknor's, which readily accounts for the chill which came on at the mention of Sumner's name. Later pages will show how this intolerant spirit went so far as to call for the withdrawal of patronage from offenders who were dependent on their earnings for the means to support their families. There is a passage in a letter from Ticknor to Hillard relating to the prison-discipline debates, of which, t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
He had pleasant meetings in Boston with other foreigners than Englishmen,—with Frederika Bremer in the winter of 1849– 1850, See Miss Bremer's Homes of the New World. with Edmond de Lafayette, grandson of the General, in August, 1850, and Jean J. Ampere, Ampere's Promenade en Amerique, vol. II. p. 36. Revue des deux Mondes, 1853, p. 20. friend of Tocqueville, in September, 1851, all of whom he took pleasure in escorting to places of interest. In a letter written in April, 1848, SumnerAmpere's Promenade en Amerique, vol. II. p. 36. Revue des deux Mondes, 1853, p. 20. friend of Tocqueville, in September, 1851, all of whom he took pleasure in escorting to places of interest. In a letter written in April, 1848, Sumner explained his early interest in certain reforms. It was a reply to a correspondent, a well-known clergyman of Boston, Rev. George Putnam, D. D. who, while disclaiming his own belief in the justice of the imputation, stated that unfriendly critics had ascribed his connection with them to ambition for notoriety and place. Sumner felt hurt at the undeserved reflection on his motives, and gave this account, in the nature of autobiography, of the way in which he was led to prominence in the dis
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
s Eddy, fellow of Oxford, by Macready; but it was not till the next session that he welcomed Thackeray. Among old English friends who visited Washington in 1852 were Lord and Lady Wharncliffe, John Stuart Wortley, the second Lord Wharncliffe. accompanied by their daughter, since Lady Henry Scott. Lord Wharncliffe, after his return home in the spring of 1852, wrote Sumner long and friendly letters; and though highly conservative, was sympathetic with his friend's antislavery position. J. J. Ampere, then a visitor in Washington, continued there the acquaintance with the senator which had begun in Boston. Sumner's first speech was made on the tenth day of the session, on the resolution of welcome to Kossuth. When the Hungarian patriot, after the subjugation of his country by the Austrians, aided by a Russian army, was in the friendly custody of Turkey, Congress by resolution, March 3, 1851, expressing the sympathy of the people, authorized the employment of a public vessel to con