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The Daily Dispatch: may 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 45 1 Browse Search
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flag is shownawy, General Beauregard sends Major Anderson another to fight under, when the fort is f and volunteers, and directed by General Beauregard Major Anderson probably wanted to be off, Generup a bombardment between them, the guns of Major Anderson making fair practice among the chimney potr popular amusement to take a lesson from Messrs. Anderson and Beauregard. Acrobats are sometimes kiadron, sent for the very purpose of assisting Anderson, which had plenty of opportunity to cross the what you like, and send the rest me. Give Major Anderson notice to quit. It that won't do, put youuregard, Charleston:-- Telegraph what Major Anderson says to that. L. P.Walker, Secretary of Wahoisted a flag of truce. [No. 9] Major Anderson, Gingham Umbrella, Fort Sumter:-- I sn to dinner and beds. As no one is hurt. Major Anderson fears he shall put General G. F. Beauregare inconvenience, the party being a large one. Anderson, Major And so ended the first (and we tr[10 more...]
Mr. Breckinridge --It is stated that Col. Anderson, in a conversation with Gov. Curtin, at Harrisburg, said he was on his way to take command of the Kentucky brigade of United States Volunteers, and that ex-Vice President Breckinridge would join him at Cincinnati, and take command under limit!--It has turned out, however, that Col. Anderson merely mentioned it to Gov. Curtin as a "gratifying report," and did not give it as a fact. Mr. Breckinridge --It is stated that Col. Anderson, in a conversation with Gov. Curtin, at Harrisburg, said he was on his way to take command of the Kentucky brigade of United States Volunteers, and that ex-Vice President Breckinridge would join him at Cincinnati, and take command under limit!--It has turned out, however, that Col. Anderson merely mentioned it to Gov. Curtin as a "gratifying report," and did not give it as a fact.
cers of the army. The invasion of Virginia, by the way of Alexandria, will also require a General of superior ability, as he will probably be compelled to encounter at some point on the route to Richmond, General Lee himself, or at all events, that dashing Artillery officer, so well known to the frequenters of Newport, John Bankhead Magruder. The defence of the York River will probably be entrusted to General Beauregard, who will enter upon the duty cox amore. In the opinion of Major Anderson, Beauregard is a soldier of infinite resources, and equal to almost any emergency. Now, it is readily to be inferred from Gen. Scott's well-known caution that he would not dream of making a movement upon Richmond, by the three routes above described, with less than 50,000 troops--20,000 for the Valley route, 20,000 for the Alexandria route, and at least 10,000 for York River. An additional force of at least 5,000 men would be required to hold Brigadier- General Ruggles (late of Mas