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military distinctions; and Gilmer, his trusted engineer. Around him was a staff who followed him with filial reverence-Preston, Brewster, O'Hara, Jack, and others. Among the younger soldiers were many who had been his pupils in war-Hardcastle, Bowen, Rich, and many more. From the walks of civil life had come to the front a number of ardent and generous young men, without experience, but strong in native character and talent: the dashing Duke, the wily Morgan, Colonel R. A. Johnson, Colonel Ben Anderson, all sons of his early friends; Gibson, his connection, brave, faithful, and accomplished, and many more allied by blood or marriage; and a gallant band of Texans, Wharton, Ashbel Smith, and others; with a multitude besides, known to him personally or by reputation and name as the inheritors of martial virtues. But why multiply names? Regulars were there, who had wintered with him in Utah; Texans who had known him on the border, as patriot leader, statesman, citizen, soldier; the me
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
he Confederate army were two companies from Louisville, under command of Capts. Ben Anderson and Fred Van Osten. They embarked on a steamer for New Orleans, April 2ompson's company, and became the Third Kentucky battalion, under command of Capt. Anderson, who was a graduate of West Point On the 25th of April a company under Captky, as a brigadier-general of volunteers. It is to be put in the hands of General Anderson and delivered to General Buckner or not at the discretion of General AnderGeneral Anderson. Of course this is to be made a secret unless and until the commission is delivered. Yours truly, A. Lincoln. Such commissions, as well as contracts for taying the war in Kentucky had fled, and the State legislature had invited General Anderson to take command. He then followed the dictates of his conscience rather t, a graduate of West Point, colonel; Albert P. Thompson, lieutenant-colonel; Ben Anderson, major; Capt. Alfred Boyd, A. Q. M.; Capt. J. Stoddard Byers, A. C. S.; Dr.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
; Third brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Statham; Morgan's squadron of cavalry. The First brigade consisted of the Fourth Alabama battalion, Thirty-first Alabama regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Crews' Tennessee battalion; Third Kentucky regiment, Lieut.-Col. Ben Anderson commanding; Fourth Kentucky regiment, Lieut.-Col. A. R. Hynes commanding; Ninth Kentucky regiment, Col. T. H. Hunt; Sixth Kentucky regiment, Col. J. H. Lewis; Byrne's battery; Cobb's battery; in all about 2,400 men. The battle of Shiloh It was thus that the Kentucky troops found themselves in one of the most stubbornly contested parts of the field, being pitted against the command of General Sherman, where was found the most stubborn resistance. In the first assault Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson and Major Johnston, of the Third Kentucky, were wounded, and Captains Stone, Pearce and Emerson, Lieutenant Bagwell, commanding company, and Acting Lieutenant White, of that regiment, were killed; while Captain Bowman, Adjutant McGoodw
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
sts were Southern, but his temperament was cool, his mind was not inflamed with politics, and like many of the people of his State and locality, he put faith in the asseverations of his Union friends who proclaimed neutrality the panacea for all our ills and the ultimate preserver of peace. He had an abiding faith in the assurance that no one would be molested for his opinions as declared by the resolutions of the legislature, the proclamation of the governor and the general orders of General Anderson when he became the military commander of Kentucky. If he had so desired or intended, he could have taken his company fully equipped away in safety and comfort, yet he remained at home until the process of arrests and the deportation of private citizens to Northern prisons began in violation of all good faith. Suddenly by night his town was invaded by a force from Camp Dick Robinson for the purpose of arresting General Breckinridge and other prominent citizens, who, like himself, had r
The following are the commanding officers of the Kentucky battalion, which left this city on Sunday night--Major, Ben Anderson; Captains Jack Thompson, Childress, Fitzhugh, and Van Osten.