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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 11 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1828. (search)
d while the fight was going on. There is also an interesting description of it by a Confederate officer, which has been communicated to the family, but never yet published. It seems from these accounts that General Wadsworth's command had been engaged for several hours on the evening of the 5th, and had lost heavily. Early the next morning General Hancock ordered it again into action on the right of the Second Corps. The enemy's division opposed to it was at first Heth's and afterwards Anderson's, which were strongly posted in thick woods, and supported by artillery placed in a small open field about two hundred yards in the rear. The ground declined gently from this field to Heth's position. Wadsworth charged repeatedly with his division, and drove the enemy back in disorder, but he was unable to retain his advantage. He was afterwards reinforced, and with six brigades made several other assaults. He fought with the most conspicuous bravery, and had two horses killed under
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1842. (search)
royed just yet, and I don't like to contemplate the fearful ruin that must overtake the South if they pursue their mad scheme. . . . . December 10.—Put on my skates this afternoon. Am aching all over. Two hundred and fifteen pounds is a heavy weight to be supported on two one-eighth-inch irons, but I love to mingle in these gay crowds. . . . . December 17.—Wonder what South Carolina is doing. Skating. . . . . December 28.—Great stir yesterday, owing to the despatch that Major Anderson had evacuated and destroyed Fort Moultrie. Some of the people talk blood and warfare, but this is easy talking far away from the probable scenes of danger. . . . . January 25, 1861.—What a short-sighted babydom prevails in Boston. The Mayor fears W. Phillips and the Abolitionists will make a riot, and so closes the Anti-slavery Convention. Boston gentlemen, or rather, Boston snobbery, must stop the mouths of the radicals and fanatics, because, forsooth, the traitors of South Car
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1858. (search)
ock reached Captain Patten. He had a regiment which never had learned to break. Changing front with the greatest rapidity and skill, he disposed his scanty band of heroes to meet the shock. It was met and stayed. For the first time that day the Rebel column was checked, and all that was left of the division and of the day was saved. Thus Captain Patten plucked up drowning honor by the locks, and snatched personal glory from a day of utter and disastrous defeat. Of this action Major Finley Anderson, soon after of General Hancock's staff, wrote to the New York Herald, and depicting the universal rout and destruction, especially on the capture of McKnight's batteries, said:— At this point, however, the tide was turned in our favor by the coolness, courage, and skill of a good line officer. It was Captain H. L. Patten, commanding the Twentieth Massachusetts Regiment, who, taking advantage of an angle of the zigzag line of breastworks, executed a change of front, poured some
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, Biographical Index. (search)
. 215. Alvord, J. W., Rev., Il 311. Amory, John. 1. 370. Amory, Jonathan, 1. 133. Amory, C. W., Lieut., II. 330. Amory, T. J. C., Col., II. 112. Anderson, R. H., Maj.-Gen. (Rebel service), I. 16. Anderson, Finley, Maj., I. 431. Anderson, Robert, Brig.-Gen., I. 61. Andrew, J. A., Gov., I. 62, 85;,166,194, Anderson, Finley, Maj., I. 431. Anderson, Robert, Brig.-Gen., I. 61. Andrew, J. A., Gov., I. 62, 85;,166,194, 258, 412; II. 31, 34;, 113, 119, 156, 188, 189, 190, 202, 216, 273, 418, 444, 462. Andrews, G. L., Brig.-Gen., I. 85, 257;, 258, 264, 268, 269, 271, 272, 366; II. 89,187, 258. Andrews, S. H., Capt., I. 245. Andros, Edmund, Sir, I. 1. Annable, Rev. C. W., II. 356. Appleton, George, I. 417. Appleton, William, I. 41Anderson, Robert, Brig.-Gen., I. 61. Andrew, J. A., Gov., I. 62, 85;,166,194, 258, 412; II. 31, 34;, 113, 119, 156, 188, 189, 190, 202, 216, 273, 418, 444, 462. Andrews, G. L., Brig.-Gen., I. 85, 257;, 258, 264, 268, 269, 271, 272, 366; II. 89,187, 258. Andrews, S. H., Capt., I. 245. Andros, Edmund, Sir, I. 1. Annable, Rev. C. W., II. 356. Appleton, George, I. 417. Appleton, William, I. 417; II. 48. Arnold, Mrs., I. 417. Atkinson, W. P., I. 350; II. 172, 250;. Augur, C. C., Maj.-Gen., I. 112; II. 289, 290;. Austin, Samuel, Jr., I. 110. B. Bailey, G. H., Capt., I. 69. Baker, E. D., Col., 1. 118,151, 207. Balch, Francis V., II. 7,10. Bancroft, George, I. 29. Banks, N. P., Maj.-Gen., I. 2