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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for G. T. Anderson or search for G. T. Anderson in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's divisionYorktown and Williamsburg. (search)
as thrown into confusion, and night coming on, only a little skirmishing ensued. About sundown General Longstreet was ordered to relieve the troops in position with one of his brigades. As his brigades were all small, two were sent, those of Anderson and Prior, by which the lines were occupied during the night with Macon's battery and two sections under Captains Garnett and McCarthy. On the morning of the 5th the bulk of the Confederate army, with its trains, was pushed forward as fast as on a line about six miles long. The country in front of the Confederate position was open for about seven hundred yards, and the edge of the forest was also levelled, so as to give a range of twelve hundred yards to the guns in Fort Magruder. Anderson's brigade occupied this fort and the vicinity; Pryor's brigade being on its right. The remainder of Longstreet's division was in bivouac beyond Williamsburg; General Longstreet simply standing on the defensive to cover the march of the army.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
ht, when a strong force met the brigades of Major-General Anderson's division, which were cooperating upon my iver a fire when close under musket-range. Major-General Anderson's division was ordered forward to support a able to break up his lines, or destroy him before Anderson's division could reach him, which would in its turn have greatly exposed Anderson. He was, therefore, ordered to halt. In a few moments the enemy, marching agho were not killed or wounded. General Wright, of Anderson's division, was ordered, with all of his officers, to rally and collect the scattered troops behind Anderson's division, and many of my-staff officers were sentnd two brigades, Semmes', under Colonel Bryan, and Anderson's, under Colonel White, were sent across as he des Brigade,84393120597  Law's Brigade,74276146496  Anderson's Brigade,10551254671  Benning's Brigade,76299122497  Anderson's Brigade,25102 127Funkstown, Md,. July 10, 1863. Total,36415824422388  Total Infantry,893423<