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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 68 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for G. T. Anderson or search for G. T. Anderson in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
Toombs and G. T. Anderson, and Drayton's brigade, in which were the Fiftieth and Fifty-first Georgia. While Jackson was fighting near Groveton on the 28th, Colonel Anderson reached Thoroughfare gap, and the Eighth Georgia, which he sent forward under Col. Benjamin Peck, was the first to pass through. Directly afterward it was aained a favorable position, but they inflicted severe punishment upon the enemy. Capt. John G. Patton brought down five with his pistol. The regulars, said Colonel Anderson, both officers and men, behaved with distinguished gallantry, as they have on every occasion in which they have met the enemy, and I only regret that our arm Medical Director Guild shows that the heaviest loss of killed and wounded in any brigade of the Confederate army on Manassas plains in August, 1862, was that of Anderson's Georgia brigade, 62, and the second heaviest loss of any regiment was by the Eleventh Georgia, 198. Lawton's brigade lost 456; Toombs', 331; Thomas', 261; Wr
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
et into east Tennessee and took part in the siege of the city of Knoxville and the assault upon the Federal works. Here Anderson's brigade was again called upon for desperate fighting. True to its record, it bravely seconded the efforts of the commanding general, adding to its already brilliant reputation. In the second day of the battle of the Wilderness, Anderson's was one of the four brigades under Mahone which attacked the Federal left wing in flank and rear, and rolled it up in confusionthen back upon the Brock road. At Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor and throughout the protracted struggle around Richmond, Anderson and his brigade continued their faithful and heroic work. He was in Field's division of Longstreet's corps in the final scene at Appomattox Court House. After the return of peace, General Anderson returned to Georgia and served in several important official stations. For awhile he was local freight agent of the Georgia railroad at Atlanta. He became chief of polic