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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
Henderson; Acting-Master's Mates, C. C. Johnson, G. H. Goodmanson and J. A. Belcher; Engineers: First-Assistant, F. J. Lovering; Second-Assistant, William Pollard; Third-Assistants, D. B. Egbert, A. G. Bonsall and J. B. Upham, Jr.; Acting-Gunner, W. Black. *Nereus--Third-rate. Commander, J. C. Howell; Lieutenant, H. E. Mullan; Acting-Master, E. L. Haines; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. K. Walsh; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, B. F. Munroe; Acting-Ensigns, E. G. Dayton, G. M. Smith and George Anderson; Acting-Master's Mates, W. C. Cushman, Wm. Rushmore, W. B. Spencer, H. E. Giraud and Wm. Gromack; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, Stephen Honton; Second-Assistant, Philip Eckenworth; Acting-Second-Assistants, R. F. Roswald and J. A. Patterson; Third-Assistants, T. Tilton, H. J. Allen and R. R. Throckmorton; Acting Gunner, J. McCaffrey. *Mohican--Third rate. Commander, Daniel Ammen; Lieutenant, J. D. Marvin; Surgeon, Charles Martin; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. C. Canning; Act
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
econd-Assistants, John D. Ford and J. W. Patterson; Acting-Third-Assistants, H. W. Whiting and Edward Kenney. Arkansas--Third-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, David Cate; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. D. G. Smith; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. G. Bishop; Acting-Ensigns, F. H. Beers and R. C. Dawes; Acting-Master's Mates, James Scully, T. E. Tinker and M. J. Nicholson; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, J. C. Cree; Acting-Second-Assistant, A. M. Clements; Acting-Third-Assistants, George Anderson and Charles Wolff. Tritonia--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, George Wiggin; Acting-Master and Pilot, J. Nicholson; Acting-Ensign, F. R. Iaschke; Acting-Master's Mates, C. A. Trundy and H. P. Fish; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, James Findley; Acting-Third-Assistant, Abraham Geer. Virginia--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Charles H. Brown; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Kinney; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. B. Hoff; Acting-Master, W. G. Mitchell., A
emely, George Hort, John Seaman, Jas. Green, Chas. Woody, Samuel Jeffery, John Phares, Chas. Besselman, Philip I. Metzger, John Carrington, John S. Thornton, Isaac W. Baldwin, Jno. Rhoads, Wm. F. Price, Allen Stubbs, Wm. Preston, Ancil Dwoggins, Wm. J. H. Clark, Thos. Hudson, Albert Murdock, Corporal Chas. Fulghum, Sergt. Andrew J. McDowell, Geo. Jones, Addison Harrington, Jacob Emrick, Acting Sergt. Major Jas. Gaston, Geo. Parmer. Wounded of company A, in hospitals at Richmond, Ky.: George Anderson, in leg; Manoah Ratliff, in leg; Peter Kirn, in both legs; Oliver Edwards, in elbow. Deserters — William Pierce and Robert Conner left their company and regiment on the twentieth day of August, and have not since been heard from. John H. Finley, Captain Company 4, Sixty-ninth. Indianapolis, Ind., September 8. To Colonel Korff : The following is a report of company F, Sixty-ninth regiment Indiana volunteers: List of paroled prisoners.--Capt. Lewis K. Harris, First Lieut. Jos.
emely, George Hort, John Seaman, Jas. Green, Chas. Woody, Samuel Jeffery, John Phares, Chas. Besselman, Philip I. Metzger, John Carrington, John S. Thornton, Isaac W. Baldwin, Jno. Rhoads, Wm. F. Price, Allen Stubbs, Wm. Preston, Ancil Dwoggins, Wm. J. H. Clark, Thos. Hudson, Albert Murdock, Corporal Chas. Fulghum, Sergt. Andrew J. McDowell, Geo. Jones, Addison Harrington, Jacob Emrick, Acting Sergt. Major Jas. Gaston, Geo. Parmer. Wounded of company A, in hospitals at Richmond, Ky.: George Anderson, in leg; Manoah Ratliff, in leg; Peter Kirn, in both legs; Oliver Edwards, in elbow. Deserters — William Pierce and Robert Conner left their company and regiment on the twentieth day of August, and have not since been heard from. John H. Finley, Captain Company 4, Sixty-ninth. Indianapolis, Ind., September 8. To Colonel Korff : The following is a report of company F, Sixty-ninth regiment Indiana volunteers: List of paroled prisoners.--Capt. Lewis K. Harris, First Lieut. Jos.
ey appeared to be working her about. This I thought strange; but as soon as we were fairly under way down the creek again, they turned the guns of the Smith Briggs on us, and also artillery from the side of the hill. During the engagement, George Anderson, (seaman,) while at the gun in the second launch, was wounded in the right hand, and when I overhauled the first launch at the mouth of the creek, I learned that Mr. Pierson was wounded in the abdomen and right arm; George Cook, (seaman,) th, producing severe flesh-wounds of the right-arm and chest; George Cook, ordinary seaman, by a musket-shot, producing flesh-wounds of left thigh and scrotum; John B. Kelly, seaman, by a sword-thrust in the abdomen, producing a serious wound; George Anderson, seaman, by musket-shot, producing flesh-wound of left hand. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Arthur Matthewson, Assistant-Surgeon United States Navy. Lieutenant Commander John H. Upshur, Commanding United States Steamer Minneso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
herself as a man, fought gallantly in a number of battles, rendered most important services as a Confederate spy, and had various hair-breadth escapes, and most romantic and thrilling adventures. As to the reality of the existence of such a personage, there can be no reasonable doubt. The publishers' circular contains certificates from Drs. J. F. Hammond and M. D. L. McCleod, of Atlanta, Georgia; Major G. W. Alexander, of Washington, Georgia; Major John Newman, of New Orleans, and General George Anderson, of Atlanta, all testifying that Madame Velasquez and Lieutenant Harry T. Buford, Confederate States Army, were one and the same individual. Major Alexauder says that she was well known to him, and that she was particularly distinguished for her devotion to the cause, for which she made many sacrifices. She was also brave, noble, and generous in disposition, ready at all times to do anything in her power for the Confederacy. We have also met with several Confederate officers who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General George Burgwyn Anderson—The memorial address of Hon. A. M. Waddell, May 11, 1885. (search)
stainless sword a spotless name. When George Anderson became an officer in the army in which hi time for the battle of the 21st of July. Colonel Anderson was soon afterwards made commandant of th. It was this: that although only a colonel, Anderson was sent for by General Joseph E. Johnston, tat confidence in his judgment and skill. Colonel Anderson remained in command at Manassas until thet with the enemy. During this engagement Colonel Anderson seized the flag of the Twenty-seventh Geoorn foe reeled and fled, and the colors which Anderson bore were planted on their breastworks. Suments, the terrible work at Malvern Hill, General Anderson, while leading a desperate charge, receivas ruined and a splendid victory won; but General Anderson's brigade was not engaged in any serious was during the attack on the centre that General Anderson received the wound which, though not suspsince the solemn procession that followed George Anderson's remains entered the gates of that silen[6 more...]
The Daily Dispatch: November 24, 1860., [Electronic resource], The Chicago Rescuers.--arrest of the Rescuers. (search)
an example of trampling upon the laws that govern this Republic. The laws of the land must be sustained, and the Grand Jury here present by their cases, have sworn to do so. He was glad to find that they had the courage to do their duty on the present occasion, however unpleasant it was to them. The Times gives the following additional particulars with regard to the arrest: The names of these Chicago nullifiers are as follows: Calvin DeWolf, Republican Justice of the Peace; George Anderson, Republican Deputy Sheriff; Isaiah H. Williams, Republican Lieutenant of Police; Holland H. Harris, Republican City Policeman; Edward Langley, Republican City Policeman; Chancellor L. Janks, Republican practitioner of law; Daniel Webster, a negro; Benjamin Mercer, a negro; Henry Lisbes, (probably Isbell,) a negro. It is stated that the jury narrowly escaped bringing in an indictment also against Alderman Joy. The nine nullifiers whose names are given above were the leading and
rgia cavalry. A correspondent of the Courtier says: A brisk fight took place on Magnolia Beach, Murrell's Inlet, on Saturday, the 5th inst., resulting in the capture of thirteen Yankee naval prisoners, the killing of two, and the wounding of three of the Yankee party. One of the killed was recognized as s South Carolina rice-field negro.--The casualties on our side were one killed and two wounded. Among the captured were three commissioned officers. Among the prisoners was George Anderson, Acting Ensign United States brig Perry, believed to be the same person who was tried in the United States District Court as concerned in the Ariel case for the murder of Capt. Ayres. A correspondent of the Augusta Chronicle, writing from Secessionville December 10th, furnishes the following: For some days the broad wings of a sombre calm have drooped lazily over the waters of our bay, and our "starry cross" has almost ceased to glitter and shine amid the smoke of the battle.
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Turning Point in Bragg's late defeat — the breaking of the "Left Centre." (search)
ted out from the top of the ridge--one in front of Anderson's, and the other in front of Deas's brigade. Soon and directed them upon the column advancing up in Anderson's front, and fired several rounds or canister uponw minutes the enemy gained the top of the point in Anderson's front. They halted a moment to get breath, and int, broke and fled in confusion down the hill. Gen. Anderson, commanding the division, was at this time in thCol. Tucker, and that the battery was captured. Gen. Anderson merely replied, "that it could not be so."--Captned around and left him. By this time the whole of Anderson's brigade had retreated, and the enemy had turned s the last to leave, and when it did, the whole of Anderson's brigade on our left and Deas' on our right, had h my own eyes. Gen. Manigault was informed that Gen. Anderson said his (Manigault's) was the first to give way. Gen. Manigault went to Gen. Anderson and asked him about it, and he denied ever having said so; but, on the c
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