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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 47 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 19 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 17 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 17 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George B. Anderson or search for George B. Anderson in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
he battle, two Georgia regiments were conspicuous. These were the Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth, temporarily attached to the North Carolina brigade of Col. George B. Anderson. Hill's division swept the enemy from its front in an impetuous charge, and captured the intrenchments before Seven Pines. The Twentysev-enth first encounded, but he kept his saddle through the second charge and until about 5 p. m., when exhausted by loss of blood he reluctantly retired. Colonel Smith, said General Anderson, approved himself a soldier and leader of the noblest qualities. While in the act of leaving the field his horse was shot under him. After this the regimented and for some time thought to be killed. The Twenty-seventh, out of 392 engaged, suffered a loss of 16 killed and 129 wounded, total 154. In the words of General Anderson, these dry figures may be truly said to speak with touching eloquence of what was done and suffered by the brave men of his brigade on Saturday, the 31st of
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
as the Twentieth North Carolina, he was elected colonel and commissioned August 20, 1861. His command remained in the Cape Fear region until a few days before the Seven Days battles at Richmond. Gen. D. H. Hill, in a description of the battle of Gaines' Mill, said: We discovered that our line overlapped that of the Federal forces and saw two brigades (afterward ascertained to be under Lawton and Winder) advancing to make a front attack upon the regulars. Brig.-Gens. Samuel Garland and G. B. Anderson, commanding North Carolina brigades in my division, asked permission to move forward and attack the right flank and rear of the division of regulars. The only difficulty in the way was a Federal battery with its infantry supports, which could enfilade them in their advance. Two regiments of Elzey's brigade, which had got separated in going across the swamp, were sent by me, by way of my left flank, to the rear of the battery to attack the infantry support, while Col. Alfred Iverson, of