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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 13 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
Index. Abbott, Henry Larcom, 130 Accidental deaths and injuries, 30, 63, 195-97, 328 Adjutant, duties of, 55 Albermarle County, Va., 355 Alexander, Edward Porter, 293, 316 Amelia County, Va., 318, 351 American Bible Society, 144 Anderson, George Thomas, 276, 286 Anderson, Richard Heron, 165, 168, 192, 209, 274 Appomattox Campaign, 238-40, 318-35, 351 Armistead, Lewis Addison, 112 Armistead, Thomas S., 229 Artillerists lauded, 53-58. Artillery, Confederate, general description of, 52-58, 95 Atlanta Campaign, 300-301, 317 Atlee's Station, Va., 269-70. Atrocities, 80-81. Badeau, Adam, 304-305. Baldwin, John Brown, 31, 50 Ball's Bluff, 61-63, 234 Baltimore, Md., 240, 354 Baptists, 139 Barksdale, Thomas, 149 Barksdale, William: before the war, 26, 28-29; during the war, 64,95, 129, 131-33, 179; troops of, 26, 64- 65, 68-71, 95, 97, 128-33, 138-39, 144, 176, 179, 223, 261, 292-93. Barnes, Beau, 252-53. Barrett, ............ (or
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
. Gartrell; Eighth, Col. Francis S. Bartow; Ninth, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth, Col. Lafayette Mc-Laws; Eleventh, Col. George T. Anderson; Twelfth, Col. Edward Johnson; Thirteenth, Col. Walter Ector. The organization of these regiments was as follow M. Foster; Read by T. C. Cone. The field and staff officers of the Eleventh regiment of Georgia volunteers were George T. Anderson, colonel; Theodore L. Guerry, lieutenant-colonel; William Luffman, major; J. F. Green, adjutant; Hockenhull, commise army of Northern Virginia except whet it was with Longstreet at Chickamauga and in east Tennessee. Its colonel, George T. Anderson, was promoted to brigadier-general and was succeeded by F. H. Little. Lieutenant-Colonel Guerry was followed by Maj S. Bartow; Ninth volunteers, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth volunteers, Col. Lafayette McLaws: Eleventh volunteers, Col. George T. Anderson; Twelfth volunteers, Col. Edward Johnson; Thirteenth volunteers, Col. Walker Ector; Fourteenth volunteers, Col.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
odgett's Georgia battery —were included in Van Dorn's division of Beauregard's army. The Twenty-first infantry, Col. John T. Mercer, was in Trimble's brigade of Kirby Smith's division; in Col. Wade Hampton's brigade, under General Whiting, in the vicinity of Dumfries, were the Nineteenth, Col. W. W. Boyd, and the Fourteenth, Col. A. V. Brumby; in General Wigfall's brigade of the same division was the Eighteenth infantry, Col. William T. Wofford, and in the garrison at Manassas, under Col. G. T. Anderson, were the Twenty-seventh regiment, Col. Levi B. Smith, and the Twenty-eighth, Col. T. J. Warthen. The Thirty-fifth infantry, Col. Edward L. Thomas, was in General French's brigade in the Aquia district, guarding the lower Potomac and subjected to frequent naval shelling by the enemy. One company from Georgia, and Alabama and Mississippi troops, composed the Jeff Davis legion, part of J. E. B. Stuart's cavalry brigade, the nucleus of the afterward famous cavalry corps of the army of
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
var H. Gee, major; W. A. Sparks, commissary; B. F. Bruton, assistant quartermaster; H. Marshall, adjutant. The captains were: (A) B. H. Gee, (B) John G. Collins, (C) W. H. Ficklin, (D) D. C. Smith, (E) M. G. Bass, (F) James M. Rouse, (G) G. F. Brown, (H) Jack Brown, (I) E. Cain (died), (K) C. J. Harris. The regiment served in the department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, part of the time guarding stores and prisoners at Macon; in 1863 was ordered to Virginia and assigned to Gen. G. T. Anderson's brigade in time to participate in the battle of Gettysburg; was then sent to Charleston, and soon after to Longstreet at Chattanooga, going with him through the Knoxville campaign. Returning to Virginia in the spring of 1864 it served from the Wilderness to Appomattox. The successors to the original officers were: Lieut.-Col. B. H. Gee, Majs. C. J. Harris, M. G. Bass and W. H. Ficklin, Adjt. M. F. Bass; Capts. (D) B. H. Miller, (E) B. L. Brown, (H) F. M. Robinson and W. W. Train,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
y General Cobb, who rode to the front, and by his coolness inspired his men to promptly retake their positions. Col. George T. Anderson at this opportune moment brought up the Seventh and Eighth Georgia, and these regiments, the Seventh led by Col.ely engaged. At the time of the battle of Seven Pines, fought about six miles east of Richmond, the brigades of George T. Anderson, Toombs, Cobb and Semmes were aligned in the order named, on the west side of the Chickahominy. But in the successrt Toombs, composed of the Second, Fifteenth, Seventeenth and Twentieth Georgia regiments, and the second, under Col. George T. Anderson, made up of the First regulars, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth and Eleventh Georgia, the old Manassas brigade. Gen. Paunt of the brigade during the night. The casualties of Lawton's brigade in the charge were 75. The Seventh, of Col. G. T. Anderson's brigade, at Malvern hill was commanded by Maj. E. W. Hoyle, who was wounded, the command devolving on Capt. Geor
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
. Jones, C. M. Wilcox, John B. Hood and J. L. Kemper. With Anderson was Wright's Georgia brigade; with Hood the Eighteenth regiment, in Hood's brigade. D. R. Jones' division was almost entirely Georgian, including the brigades of Toombs and G. T. Anderson, and Drayton's brigade, in which were the Fiftieth and Fifty-first Georgia. While Jackson was fighting near Groveton on the 28th, Colonel Anderson reached Thoroughfare gap, and the Eighth Georgia, which he sent forward under Col. Benjamin Peuring the day Capt. J. R. Troup rendered very important service in rallying troops; and other aides, Capt.. D. M. DuBose, Cadet W. T Lamar, Capt. A. A. F. Hill, and Lieut. J. J. Grant, and Courier Thomas Paschal were warmly commended.] Col. G. T. Anderson's Georgia brigade won new honors fighting under D. H. Hill, but the gallant colonel commanding reported that he could not discriminate by mention of cases of individual bravery. The list of casualties showed 894 killed, wounded and missin
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
battle, four more Georgia brigades were brought into action. In McLaws' division were the brigade of Gen. P. J. Semmes—Tenth regiment, Col. John B. Weems; Fiftieth, Col. W. R. Manning; Fifty-first, Col. E. Ball; and the brigade of Gen. W. T. Wofford—Sixteenth regiment, Col. Goode Bryan; Eighteenth, Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff; Twenty-fourth, Col. Robert McMillan; Cobb's legion, Lieut.-Col. Luther J. Glenn; Phillips' legion. Lieut. E. S. Barclay. In Hood's division were the brigade of Gen. George T. Anderson—Seventh Georgia, Col. W. W. White; Eighth, Col. John R. Towers; Ninth, Lieut.-Col. John C. Mounger; Eleventh, Col. F. H. Little, and Fifty-ninth, Col. Jack Brown; and the brigade of Gen. Henry L. Benning—Second regiment, Lieut.-Col. William T. Harris; Fifteenth, Col. D. M. DuBose; Seventeenth, Col. W. C. Hodges, and Twentieth, Col. John A. Jones. McLaws' division got into position opposite the Federal left about 4 p. m. Hood's division was moved on farther to the enemy's left, w
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
ot supported and failed, with severe loss. In the evening they went into the Federal works. Maj. M. Kendrick was distinguished in command of the left wing of the Thirty-seventh. This regiment took into battle 425 men and lost 19 killed, 168 wounded and 7 missing. The sharpshooters had 92 engaged and lost 35, mainly wounded. The Sixty-fifth Georgia, Col. R. H. Moore, was mainly engaged as a support to Maj. A. Leyden's artillery battalion, also a Georgia command. Of Longstreet's corps, Anderson's, Wofford's and Bryan's Georgia brigades did not arrive in time to participate in the battle. The brigade of Gen. Henry L. Benning, however, took a prominent part in the fight of both days. On Saturday, fighting on the Rossville road against Rosecrans' right, they pushed back the enemy and held their ground with dogged resolution, unsupported by artillery, but under fire both of artillery and infantry. On Sunday, in the victorious advance of Longstreet, they were conspicuous for gallant
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
e's conduct of the campaign excited the wonder of the world, and would have secured his fame if it had nothing else on which to rest. We will give a sketch of the part played by Georgia commands in this wonderful campaign, in which Lee with 64,000 men met and baffled Grant's 118,000, with all their bounteous resources and desperate efforts. In the army of Northern Virginia, four of the nine brigades of Longstreet's corps were Georgians—the brigades of William T. Wofford, Goode Bryan, George T. Anderson and Henry L. Benning. In Ewell's corps, John B. Gordon's brigade was a third of Early's division, and one of the five brigades of Rodes' division was George Doles' Georgians. In A. P. Hill's corps were the brigade of Ambrose R. Wright, Anderson's division, and the brigade of Edward L. Thomas, Wilcox's division. Callaway's and Carlton's Georgia batteries were in the artillery of Longstreet's corps, commanded by a Georgian, Gen. E. P. Alexander. Milledge's battery was with the Second
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
-general, honored the State as commander of the Second army corps. Longstreet, closely connected with the State and now one of its citizens, led the First corps with the same grim earnestness that had characterized his four years service. George T. Anderson, Henry L. Benning and E. L. Thomas continued in command of their gallant brigades. Brig.-Gen. Clement A. Evans, first succeeding Gordon in brigade leadership, was now promoted to acting major-general, in command of the division including hed a parting glory over the last hours of the illustrious army of Northern Virginia. Following is the organization of the Georgia commands in the final operations: Longstreet's corps. In C. W. Fields' division: Brigade of Gen. George T. Anderson—Seventh regiment, Col. George H. Carmical; Eighth, Col. John R. Towers; Ninth, Maj. John W. Arnold; Eleventh, Capt. W. H. Ramsey; Fifty-ninth, Col. Jack Brown. Brigade of Gen. Henry L. Benning —Second regiment, Capt. Thomas Chaffin, Jr.
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