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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, C. H. Hilling; Acting-Third-Assistant, C. L. Rider. Steam-tug Mignonette. Acting-Ensign, Henry D. Green; Acting-Master's Mate, Wm. Edgar; Engineers, Acting-Second-Assistant, Dan'l Barnum; Acting-Third-Assistant, Mark Wade. Steam-tug Daisy. Acting-Master, Daniel C. Bowers; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, F. M. Magers; Acting-Third-Assistant, H. A. Cady. Steam-tug Mistletoe. Acting-Ensign, James L. Quigley; Acting-Master's Mate, James Anderson; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistants, F. P. Seavy and Charles Metzger. Steam-tug Myrtle. Acting-Ensign, I. N. Goldsmith; Acting Master's Mate, Charles Lyon; Engineer: Acting-Second-Assistant, Thompson Guernsey. Steam-tug Dahlia. Acting-Ensign, W. H. Strope; Acting-Master's Mate, Thomas Roach; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, J. H. Everhart; Acting-Second-Assistant, John Cook. Steam-tug Hyacinth. Acting-Ensign, J. B. Hiserman; Acting-Master's Mate, James Nelis; Enginee
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
es. This fight lasted a whole day, and most of the work was done by the Navy. The Confederates left seven killed on the field, and took away a number of wounded. The place was soon after reinforced from Natchez, and the enemy departed. Captain Anderson, the commander of the negro troops at Waterproof, was so grateful for the service rendered by the Forest Rose that he wrote Lieutenant Johnston the following letter, which we give, with pleasure, as a memento of the gallant officer who fought his ship so well. It will be noticed that the name of the Forest Rose frequently appears in this recital of events. She was a small vessel, but one that did good service under the gallant officers who commanded her. The following is Captain Anderson's letter: Headquarters' Post, Waterproof, La., February 19, 1864. Sir — Permit me to return you many thanks for the gallant manner in which you defended my little force against the rebel force of Colonel Mores, Colonel McNeal, and Maj
liver up, and, further, that some of those which were surrendered had been broken. The whole conduct of the officers of Fort Gaines and Fort Morgan presents such a striking contrast in moral principle that I cannot fail to remark upon it. Colonel Anderson, who commanded the former, finding himself in a position perfectly untenable, and encumbered with a superfluous number of conscripts, many of whom were mere boys, determined to surrender a fort which he could not defend, and in this determin Wm. McEwan, Acting Third Assistant-Engineer. Slightly Wounded — L. P. Adams, Lieutenant; Robert Dixon, Boatswain; William A. Donaldson, seaman; George A. Wightman, landsman; Michael English, second-class fireman; James F. Brown, landsman; James Anderson, seaman; Stephen H. Jackson, first-class boy. Killed, twenty-three; wounded severely and transferred to hospital at Pensacola, twenty; wounded slightly, remaining on board, eight. Total, fifty-one. Respectfully, P. Lansdale, Surgeon.
ecember 19, 1864. Reports of casualties in fifth Kentucky cavalry, from November thirteenth to December seventeenth, 1864. No.NAMERank.Co.Date.Place.Remarks. 1John W. Forrester,CaptainKNov. 28Buckhead Creek, Ga.Killed in action. 2Burly Willis,CorporalGDec. 1Near Louisville, Ga., or Millen's GroveKilled in action. 1Pierson Hatler,SergeantDDec. 1do.do.Wounded mortally. 2John Daisy,PrivateADec. 1do.do.Wounded severely. 3T. B. McAlister,PrivateADec. 1do.do.Wounded slightly. 4James Anderson,PrivateADec. 1do.do.Wounded slightly. 5Pleasant Garner,PrivateDDec. 1do.do.Wounded slightly. 6Nic. Wilson,PrivateIDec. 1do.do.Wounded severely. 7William Clements,PrivateKDec. 1do.do.Wounded slightly. 8Aaron McClusky,PrivateGDec. 1do.do.Wounded slightly. 9Joseph Dooley,PrivateGNov. 28Griswoldville, Ga.Wounded slightly. 10George Branhan,PrivateFNov. 28do.do.Wounded slightly. 11John Chesser,PrivateLDec. 1do.do.Missing in action. 12J. C. Smith,PrivateGDec. 7Springfield, Ga.Missing i
umbus, Kentucky, who was captured, has friends in Cincinnati. Another from Covington, Kentucky, named Jones, belonging to the same regiment, was also captured. The loss of the Sixty-sixth and Second Iowa, was very slight. The next day the Sixty-sixth Indiana found sixty-three dead rebels in their front. On the twenty-ninth Colonel Mersey's brigade relieved Colonel Rice's, and still the skirmishing continued. Company B, of the Eighty-first Ohio, was deployed as skirmishers, and Private James Anderson, of Company D, volunteered to go also. Very soon he was borne back mortally wounded. All day the heavy skirmishing was kept up. The lines were so close that rebel balls reached even beyond the headquarters of Generals Sweeny and Dodge. No general attack was made, however. It was after eleven o'clock at night, of the twenty-ninth, when as some of us were listening to the dull, heavy booming of Hooker's guns to the left, a bright flash of a musket to the right, and in front of ou
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
Amory, Copley, 898 Amory, E. L., 160 Amory, Francis, 580 Amory, R. G., 237 Amory, T. J. C., 167,205,398,503,610 Amory, W. A., 205 Anderson, Edward, 457 Anderson, F. C., 498 Anderson, G. C., 4 Anderson, G. E., 4 Anderson, J. D., 4 Anderson, J. F., 4 Anderson, J. F., 167,237,398,503 Anderson, John, 237 Anderson, John, 237,398,503 Anderson, Nicholas, 4 Anderson, R. N., 457 Anderson, T. A., 610 Andrew, J. A., 579,593,604,606,608,610,630 Andrews, A. H., 398,503 Andrews, C. J., 4Anderson, J. F., 167,237,398,503 Anderson, John, 237 Anderson, John, 237,398,503 Anderson, Nicholas, 4 Anderson, R. N., 457 Anderson, T. A., 610 Andrew, J. A., 579,593,604,606,608,610,630 Andrews, A. H., 398,503 Andrews, C. J., 4 Andrews, D. W., 4 Andrews, E. A., 237 Andrews, E. P., 237 Andrews, G. L., 167,205,898,503,611 Andrews, G. W., 237 Andrews, R. F., 484,568 Andrews, R. R., 237 Andrews, S. H., 237 Andrews, Thomas, 4 Andrews, W. H., 398,457,503 Annable, E. A., 237 Annable, T. H., 237 Annan, Frank, 237 Annand, Augustus, 237 Anson, R. E., 4 Anthony, C. M., 4 Appleton, C. F., 237 Appleton, G. H., 4 Appleton, H. D., 580 Appleton, J. W. M., 205,612 Appleton, Nathan, 237,504 Appleton, Samuel, 237
died in Boston, aged 67, Feb. 4, 1867 American Flag adopted by the American States, June 14, 1777 Old glory, Anniversary Centennial Celebration, June 14, 1877 Amnesty to Rebeldom; President Lincoln's Proclamation, Nov. 8, 1863 Anderson, Maj. Robert of Fort Sumpter memory, visits Boston, July 6, 1865 Andrew, John A. Massachusetts' great War Governor, died, aged 49, Oct. 30, 1867 Angel A printer's sign in Cornhill street, 1654 Angel Gabriel with his horn, a ont, on Tremont street, first opened, Sep. 24, 1827 Madam Celeste dancing there, Nov. 20, 1827 William Pelby became manager, Jan. 28, 1828 Junius Brutus Booth playing, July 29, 1828 Edwin Forrest playing Metamora, Oct. 10, 1831 James Anderson mobbed there, Nov. 16, 1831 Mrs. Vincent's first appearance, Sep. 12, 1832 Ravel family playing, Nov. 5, 1832 Yankee Hill playing, Aug. 17, 1837 The last theatrical play there, June 17, 1843 Theatres Tremont, on Tremont st
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
sh Jasper Greens, Savannah Cadets and Oglethorpe Light Infantry. It was reorganized in October, 1862, and served on the coast until May, 1864. Its organization was as follows: Col. Charles H. Olmstead, Lieut.-Col. W. S. Rockwell (succeeded by W. J. Ford, who was at first major), Commissary E. W. Drummond, Asst. Quartermasters E. Hopkins and F. M. Hull, Adjt. M. H. Hopkins. The following were the captains: Company A, J. H. Flannery; Company B, David O'Connor, James Dooner; Company C, J. W. Anderson, S. W. Anderson; Company D, S. Y. Levy, P. C. Elkins; Company E, J. M. Doherty; Company F, J. S. Turner; Company G, A. C. Davenport, G. Eberhart; Company H, F. W. Sims, J. Lachlison; Company I, C. Werner, C. A. H. Umbach; Company K, John Cooper. In April, 18621 Colonel Olmstead, with Company H (the Oglethorpe Light Infantry The Oglethorpe Light Infantry of this regiment was originally a part of the company of that name which went with Bartow to Virginia and was assigned to the Eighth
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
essee on Gen. W. H. T. Walker's staff with the rank of major, after the death of that officer returned to the battalion as major. Edward C. Clayton was adjutant and was killed in battle. Joseph H. Taliaferro became captain of Company C, and J. W. Anderson of Company D. The Thirteenth battalion Georgia infantry had for its officers at organization: Maj. George A. Gordon, Adjt. L. T. Mallory, Commissary W. J. Neville, Surg. J. B. Read; Capts. (A) George R. Black, (B) John R. Giles, (C) James ttox. The Twelfth Georgia battalion of artillery had the following officers: Lieut.-Col. H. D. Capers, Majs. G. M. Hanvey and S. H. Crump, Adjts. F. W. Baker (killed) and B. F. Clayton (killed), Asst. Quartermaster Ker Boyce; Capts. (A) J. W. Anderson, (B) J. W. Rudisill, (C) G. W. Johnson, (D) J. N. Taliaferro, (E) J. J. Newsome, (F) G. M. Hood. This battalion served both as infantry and artillery. During the last year of the war it served almost entirely as infantry in Evans' brigade,
The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1861., [Electronic resource], Decision in the case of the fugitive murderer Anderson. (search)
Decision in the case of the fugitive murderer Anderson. --The final decision in the case of Anderson, the colored fugitive, was given at Hamilton, Canada, on thAnderson, the colored fugitive, was given at Hamilton, Canada, on the 16th inst. The court sustained the decision of the Court of Queen's Bench on the question of law, and was unanimous in discharging the prisoner on a technicality in the commitment. Anderson is, therefore, set at liberty. Great joy was manifested, especially among the colored population. Anderson was claimed not as a fugitive Anderson was claimed not as a fugitive slave, but on a charge of murder perpetrated in Missouri. He was a slave, but ran away from his master in that State, was pursued there in its territory by a white man, who was shot dead by Anderson. The latter then escaped to Canada, where he was arrested, and his delivery claimed under the Asherton treaty. The Canadian court ustice Cockburn, of England, who issued a writ of habeas corpus directing that Anderson be brought before him in London. This writ, however, has been substantially d
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