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The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 13 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 6 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 6 0 Browse Search
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of rendering, according to Mrs. Crawford, attests his earliest political predilections: Let auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind, May Jackson be our president, And Adams left behind. A mournful and distressing ballad, John Anderson's Lamentation, as rendered by Abe, was written out for me by Mrs. Crawford, but the first lines, Oh, sinners, poor sinners, take warning by me, The fruits of transgression behold now and see, will suffice to indicate how mournful the rest or force returned. By the time he had reached his seventeenth year he had attained the physical proportions of a full-grown man. He was employed to assist James Taylor in the management of a ferry-boat across the Ohio river near the mouth of Anderson's creek, but was not allowed a man's wages for the work. He received thirty-seven cents a day for what he afterwards told me was the roughest work a young man could be made to do. In the midst of whatever work he was engaged on he still found
Waterloo bearing the tidings of his own defeat, but with joy proclaiming the era of Union victory and peace among men. The war was over. The great rebellion which for four long years had been assailing the nation's life was quelled. Richmond, the rebel capital, was taken; Lee's army had surrendered; and the flag of the Union was floating in reassured supremacy over the whole of the National domain. Friday, the 14th of April, the anniversary of the surrender of Fort Sumter in 1861 by Major Anderson to the rebel forces, had been designated by the Government as the day on which the same officer should again raise the American flag upon the fort in the presence of an assembled multitude, and with ceremonies befitting so auspicious an occasion. The whole land rejoiced at the return of peace and the prospect of renewed prosperity to the country. President Lincoln shared this common joy, but with a deep intensity of feeling which no other man in the whole land could ever know. He saw
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Brooklyn at the passage of the forts. (search)
in command of the Brooklyn at New Orleans. From a photograph. the rail, where I could watch our approach to the forts, and I mounted this ladder several times to see what was going on as we advanced. On the poop were Captain Craven, Midshipman John Anderson, who had volunteered a few days before from the Montgomery, which did not take part in the action, Captain's Clerk J. G. Swift, afterward a graduate of West Point and a lieutenant in the army, and two quartermasters. There was a small p cable secured us just where the Confederates had the range of their guns, but somebody ran up with an axe and cut the hawser, and we began to steam up the river. I went on the poop to help clear the hawser, and looked around for my classmate Anderson. He must have been knocked overboard by a shot when we first came to the obstructions. The anchor on the port quarter was broken off close to the stock at this point by a shot from Fort Jackson.--J. R. B. A few moments later there was a sudden
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
deck, would he consent to be carried below. Lieutenant James Forney, commanding the marines, had two guns assigned him, and, with his men, fought most gallantly. I was early deprived of the services of my signal officer and aid, Acting Midshipman John Anderson, by a shot, which cut him and the signal quartermaster, Barney Sands, nearly in two. Young Anderson was a most promising and gallant young gentleman, and had, only a few days previously, volunteered from another vessel, which had beAnderson was a most promising and gallant young gentleman, and had, only a few days previously, volunteered from another vessel, which had been detailed for other duty, to join this ship; he was knocked overboard and killed instantly. Immediately afterward, my young clerk, Mr. J. G. Swift, (who had been meanwhile taking notes,) asked me to let him act as my aid; and the prompt, self-possessed manner in which he performed his duty in conveying my orders elicited my highest admiration. The conduct of Quartermaster James Buck, stationed at the wheel, merits particular mention. Early in the fight he received a severe and painful con
Forney, commanding the marines, had two guns assigned him, and with his men fought most gallantly. I was early deprived of my signal officer and aid, Acting Midshipman John Anderson, by a shot, which cut him and the Signal Quartermaster, Barney Sands, nearly in two. Young Anderson was a most promising and gallant young gentleman,Anderson was a most promising and gallant young gentleman, and had only a few days previous volunteered from another vessel, which had been detailed for other duty, to join this ship. He was knocked overboard and killed instantly. Immediately afterwards my young clerk, Mr. J. G. Swift (who had been meanwhile taking notes) asked me to let him act as my aid, and the prompt self-possessedoseph Lawrence, seaman, by a shot; William Brown, landsman, by a shell; Aug. Thomas, captain of the forecastle, by a shell. Total, three. On the Brooklyn — John Anderson, midshipman, struck and knocked overboard by a cannonshot; Wm. Lenahan, marine; Daniel McEmary, boy; Barry Sands, Quartermaster; Thos. White, captain of the ma
21. O Johnny Bull my Jo John! air--John Anderson my Jo. It was stated in the Dispatch during the last days of December, that a gentleman just from the West-Indies had said that there were eighty-seven British ships-of-war lying in those waters. This statement gave rise to the following imitation of an old song: O Johnny Bull my Jo John! I wonder what you mean, By sending all these frigates out, commissioned by the Queen; You'll frighten off the Yankees, John, and why should you do so? Best catch and sink or burn them all, O Johnny Bull my Jo! O Johnny Bull my Jo John! when Yankee hands profane, Were laid in wanton insult upon the lion's mane, He roared so loud and long, John, they quickly let him go, And sank upon their trembling knees, O Johnny Bull my Jo! O Johnny Bull my Jo John! when Lincoln first began To try his hand at war, John, you were a peaceful man; But now your blood is up, John, and well the Yankees know, You play the d--1 when you start, O Johnny Bull my Jo
ormy one, Mr. Holt, feebly seconded by the President, urging the immediate reinforcement of Sumter, while Thompson, Floyd, and Thomas contended that a quasi-treaty had been made by the officers of the Government with the leaders of the rebellion, to offer no resistance to their violations of law and seizures of Government property. Floyd especially blazed with indignation at what he termed the violation of honor. At last Mr. Thompson formally moved that an imperative order be issued to Major Anderson to retire from Sumter to Fort Moultrie--abandoning Sumter to the enemy and proceeding to a post where he must at once surrender. Stanton could sit still no longer, and rising, he said, with all the earnestness that could be expressed in his bold and resolute features: Mr. President, it is my duty, as your legal adviser, to say that you have no right to give up the property of the Government, or abandon the soldiers of the United States to its enemies; and the course proposed by the Se
ite, Patrick McDonnell, William Gleason, Michael Carr, Thomas Hagerty, Timothy Huggins, Alexander McCabe, James Flemming, Patrick Fitzgerald, Thomas McKernon, Edward Pritchard, Charles Rheins, Timothy Hurley, John McGrath, Matthew Walshe, Patrick Sullivan, Michael Sullivan, ** Thomas Sullivan, Patrick Clare, John Hennessey, Hugh Deagan, Maurice Powers, Abner Carter, Daniel McMurray, Patrick Malone, James Corcoran, Patrick Abbott, John McNealis, Michael Egan, Daniel Donovan, John Wesley, John Anderson, John Flood, Peter O'Hare, Michael Delaney, Terence Mulhern. The inquiry may naturally arise how this small number of men could take charge of so large a body of prisoners. This required that to their valor they should add stratagem. A few men were placed on the parapet as sentinels, the rest were marched out as a guard to receive the prisoners and their arms. Thus was concealed the fact that the fort was empty. The report of the guns bombarding the fort had been heard, and soon
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 (search)
of entering New York before night. Arnold had furnished him with papers revealing the condition of the highland stronghold. At Tarrytown, 27 miles from the city, he was stopped (Sept. 23) and searched by three young militiamen, who, finding those papers concealed under the feet of Andre in his boot, took him to the nearest American post. The commander (Colonel Jameson) did not seem to comprehend the matter, and unwisely allowed Andre (who bore a pass from Arnold in which he was called John Anderson ) to send a letter to Arnold telling him of his detention. Washington returned from Hartford sooner than he expected. He rode over from Fishkill towards Arnold's quarters early in the morning. Two of his military family (Hamilton and Lafayette) went forward to breakfast with Arnold, while Washington tarried to inspect a battery. While they were at breakfast Andre‘s letter was handed to Arnold. With perfect self-possession he asked to be excused, went to his wife's room, bade her far
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bankruptcy laws, past and present. (search)
pay his debts. In short, in the United States hereafter, he who has uncontrovertible property in plenty but little cash on hand — as, for example, he who is land poor — may yet be solvent and entitled to the time to realize and pay his creditors. At first blush this seems broadly equitable, but what will be the result in actual practice? Perhaps, had it been in force, the author of Waverley, with his vast genius as his property, would not have been insolvent, and that other Scotchman, Anderson by name, who possessed, yet would not surrender, the secret formula for a popular nostrum, might have proved it overworth his debts, and escaped the penalties of the law. On the other hand, into what dangerous controversies will it lead us! Hitherto the proof of insolvency has been simple and easy. Now it never can be. The expert on values has a new field open to him, as creditors and debtors, not to speak of lawyers and courts, may quickly learn. In practice, the law will, therefore,
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