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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 13 1 Browse Search
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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Exodus. (search)
slaves, who had been increased in number by the birth of a child at Ossawatomie. It was named, Captain John Brown. When at the third resting place of Jim Lane's army, which had been named Concord, but which subsequent settlers called Holton, a party of thirty proslavery men, who had followed them from Lecompton, approached so near that it was necessary to halt and make a defence. The old man had at this time four white companions and three negro men. The whites were Stevens, Tidd, and Anderson, (who fought at Harper's Ferry,) and another Kansas boy. The Captain took possession of two log cabins in the wood, which the pursuers surrounded — at a distance,--while they sent to Atchison and Lecompton for further aid. From Atchison twelve men arrived; thus making a force of forty-two men opposed to eight only. They were preparing for the attack, when Captain Brown and his men issued from the woods for the purpose of offering fight. The Sheriff's Lecompton posse turned and fled! Not
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: assembling to conspire. (search)
r. The following resolution was then introduced by Mr. Brown, and unanimously passed. Resolved, That John Brown, J. H. Kagi, Richard Realf. L. F. Parsons, C. H. Tidd, C. Whipple, C. W. Moffit, John E. Cook, Owen Brown, Steward Taylor, Osborn Anderson. A. M. Ellsworth, Richard Richardson, W. H. Leeman, and John Lawrence, be, and are hereby, appointed a Committee, to whom is delegated the power of the Convention to fill by election all offices specially named in the Provisional Constituti Smith, Simon Fislin, Isaac Holley, James Smith. Signed, J. H. Kagi, Secretary of the Convention. Memorandum — offices filled. Commander-in-Chief-John Brown. Secretary of War--J. H. Kagi. Members of Congress-Alfred 31. Ellsworth, Osborn Anderson. Treasurer — Owen Brown. Secretary of Treasury--Geo. B. Gill. Secretary of State--Richard Realf. Promising that the plan of the Liberators was not extradition into the North, but emancipation in the South, - not to run off negroes to C
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Monday, may 10th, 1859-- (search)
Monday, may 10th, 1859--9 1/2 P. M. The Convention assembled and went into balloting for the election of Treasurer and Secretary of Treasury. Owen Brown was elected to the former office, and George B. Gill to the latter. The following resolution was then introduced by Mr. Brown, and unanimously passed. Resolved, That John Brown, J. H. Kagi, Richard Realf. L. F. Parsons, C. H. Tidd, C. Whipple, C. W. Moffit, John E. Cook, Owen Brown, Steward Taylor, Osborn Anderson. A. M. Ellsworth, Richard Richardson, W. H. Leeman, and John Lawrence, be, and are hereby, appointed a Committee, to whom is delegated the power of the Convention to fill by election all offices specially named in the Provisional Constitution, which may be vacant after the adjournment of the Convention. The Convention then adjourned sine die. Signed, J. Kagi, Secretary of the Convention
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: making ready. (search)
ded to Summit, Portage, and Ashtabula Counties, in Ohio. He went from Ohio to Chambersburg, stopping at Pittsburg City and Bedford. He remained at Chambersburg toward the close of June, for several days; and, on the 30th, with two sons and Captain Anderson, left for Hagerstown, in Maryland. The next movements of the party are thus described by a resident of Hagerstown, a pro-slavery man, in a letter written after the arrest of Captain Brown at Harper's Ferry: John Brown, his two sons, and a Captain Anderson spent a night here, at the Washington House, in June, and were taken to Harper's Ferry next day in a hack. When here I was struck with the long beard of one of them, and called over to learn who they were and where they came from. Brown registered as Smith and two sons, from Western New York, and told Mr. Singling, the landlord, that they had got tired of farming in that region; that the frosts had taken their crops for two or three years; that they were going to Virg
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: sword in hand. (search)
ed the numbers of the Invaders forty-fold. The public buildings were already in the hands of the Liberators, and at the bridges, and the corners of the principal streets, armed sentinels, wrapped in blankets, were seen stationed, or walking up and down. Every man who appeared in the street was forthwith arrested and imprisoned in the Armory. Captain Brown and his sons Oliver and Watson, Stevens and two others, were stationed inside of the Armory grounds; Kagi, with Leeman, Stewart Taylor, Anderson, (black,) and Copeland, (colored,) held the lower part of the town and the rifle works; Cook, Owen Brown, Tidd, Merriam, and Barclay Coppoc were stationed at the cabins of the Kennedy Farm and the school house; while the remainder were posted as guards at the bridges and at the corners of the streets and the public buildings. Early in the morning Captain Brown sent an order to the Wager House for breakfast for forty-five men his hostages and company. By eight o'clock the number of Virg