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Georgia, January 2, 1904. Lieutenant-generals of the Confederacy—group no. 2 Wade Hampton fought from Bull Run to Bentonville. With J. E. B. Stuart's Cavalry he stood in the way of Sheridan at Trevilian Station in 1864. Richard Henry Anderson commanded a brigade on the Peninsula; later he commanded a division and, after the Wilderness, Longstreet's Corps. John Brown Gordon. This Intrepid leader of forlorn Hope assaults rose from a civilian captain to the Second highest rankone of the most efficient officers in the Confederate army, and rose to the command of the Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, when it was created in May, 1863, being made lieutenant-general at the same time. He was killed April 2, 1865. Anderson's Corps—Army of Northern Virginia Organized late in 1864 to consist of the divisions of Major-Generals R. F. Hoke and Bushrod R. Johnson, and a battalion of artillery under Colonel H. P. Jones. It contained an aggregate strength of about fou
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
hands of the President, and empowering him, if necessary, to call out the militia, not only of the vicinity but of all the States. (Ibid, p. 255.) This substitute was finally adopted by a vote of 15 to 11, all the Western senators present voting in its favor. The resolutions as amended were then adopted unanimously, February 25, 1803. (Annals of Congress, 1802– 1803, p. 107.) It may be interesting to note the sentiment of the Western people, as expressed by their senators. Said Mr. Anderson, of Tennessee: Gentlemen wished to treat the people like little children. * * * He care from a part of the country which was greatly interested in the subject, and he knew the people were not such fools as the gentlemen would make them. They will not believe that those who know them, and have taken the most effectual measures to procure safety and security for them, are plotting evil for them. (Annals of Congress, 1802-1803, p. 214.) He knew this people and that they wished for peace
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
hat Mr. Fox, who had been allowed to visit Maj. Anderson, on the pledge that his purpose was pacifiincoln had determined on at least withdrawing Anderson from Fort Sumter as a tentative movement towang States until after the concentration of Maj. Anderson's command at Fort Sumter, and after the inermission, continued into April, 1861, for Maj. Anderson to purchase fresh provisions in the marketn. The opinion extensively prevailed that Major Anderson's command would be withdrawn. Mr. Forsythhere yesterday with orders to that effect for Anderson. On the same day Captain Foster, U. S. EnginHere he held a confidential interview with Maj. Anderson, and on the 22d left for Washington. Mr. esident Lincoln, and having an interview with Anderson, returned to Charleston. General Beauregard ing heard a rumor that he would require of Maj. Anderson a formal surrender, hastened on the 26th, for it to be done; otherwise the fleet and Maj. Anderson were prepared to see that the fort was hel[6 more...]
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
as volunteer aide on the staff of General Beauregard, he and Captain Stephen D. Lee bore to Major Anderson the formal demand to surrender, and again with Beauregard at Manassas he was sent to Richmons graduated at West Point in 1842, in the class with Longstreet, A. P. Stewart, G. W. Smith, R. H. Anderson and Van Dorn, and his first service was on the Maine frontier. During the Mexican war he paon of lieutenant-general commanding the department east of the Mississippi. Lieutenant-General Richard Henry Anderson Lieutenant-General Richard Henry Anderson, distinguished as a corps commandLieutenant-General Richard Henry Anderson, distinguished as a corps commander in the army of Northern Virginia, was born near Statesboro, S. C., October 7, 1821. In 1842 he was graduated at the United States military academy; was assigned to the Second dragoons in 1844; joporary command of Longstreet's division, and at a critical moment the magnificent brigade of R. H. Anderson came to the support of Hill. At Gaines' Mill he was in command of his brigade on the extrem
ght commenced at ten minutes to seven o'clock A. M., and lasted to fifteen minutes to two o'clock P. M. On the right we had 400; on the left not exceeding 700. Our boys fought like veterans. The right was defended by the 31st regiment, Hansbrough's and Rogers's battalions, reinforced by two companies of Georgians. The enemy were finally driven back by a charge On the left the defence was made by the 52d regiment, commanded by Major Ross; eight companies of the 12th Georgia, Miller's, and Anderson's batteries. "Enclosed I send you a list of the killed and wounded in the 31st. Major Boykin behaved nobly, and richly merits promotion. I have just heard that Col. Wm. L. Jackson has been reinstated to his regiment, Major Boykin promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel, and John S. Hoffman, Major. The boys are delighted. They say, with such men they can "whip the--" Col. Johnson says they have covered themselves with glory. He was in chief command. I wish he was General, for he fully deser