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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
d T. H. Stevens [commanding at different times]; Lieutenant, S. Dana Greene; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. Flye; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, D. C. Logue; Acting-Asssistant Paymaster, W. F. Keeler; Acting-Master, L. M. Stodder; Assistant Engineers, A. B. Campbell, Geo. H. White, R. W. Hands and M. T. Sunstrom; Acting-Master's Mates, (Geo. Frederickson and Peter Williams. Steamer Jacob Bell. Lieutenant--Commander, E. P. McCrea; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, O. J. Bissell; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Samuel Anderson; Acting-Assistant Engineers, Arthur Clements, Nelson Ross and R. H. Buel; Acting-Master's Mate, E. McConnell. Steamer Port Royal. Lieutenant-Commander, George U. Morris, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. P. Randall [commanding at different times]; Lieutenant, H. D. Todd; Assistant Surgeon, W. S. Fort; Assistant Paymaster, J. A. Bates, Jr.; Assistant Engineers, W. C. Selden, G. W. Sensner, O. C. Lewis, F. B. Allen and E. M. Breese; Acting-Master's Mates, W. F. Reynolds
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
illips and George Smith. Steamer Currituck. Acting-Master, W. H. Smith; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Henry Johnson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Frank Clark; Acting-Ensigns, Thomas Nelson, Ambrose Felix and J. A. Havens; Acting-Master's Mate, G. B. Hall; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Alfred Clum; Acting-Third-Assistants, O. P. Thompson and C. B. Wright. Steamer Jacob Bell. Acting-Master, G. C. Shultze; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Wm. Neilson, Jr.; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Samuel Anderson; Acting-Ensigns, Benjamin Walker and D. W. Hodson; Acting-Master's Mates, Robert L. Omensetter and Arthur Clegg; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Thomas Bentley; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. H. White and J. H. McConnell. Steamer Fuchsia. Acting-Master, Wm. T. Street; Acting-Ensign, C. H. Walker; Acting-Master's Mates, W. G. Borden and S. B. Cline; Engineers: Acting Second-Assistant, S. H. Magee; Acting-Third-Assistants, C. Castell and A. F. Bullard. Steamer Coeur de Lion.
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
ollowed the marching column, that some one brought me an invitation to dine with a sister of Sam. Anderson, who was a cadet at West Point with me; but the messenger reached me after we had passed thefty men (about fifty of them killed or wounded), were in his power. The commanding officer, Major Anderson, was at that moment a prisoner, and General Hazen invited him in to take supper with us, whiched Cheeves's Mill, where my horse awaited me, and rode on to General Howard's headquarters at Anderson's plantation, on the plank-road, about eight miles back of Savannah. I reached this place abouGeneral W. T. Sherman, Savannah (via Hilton Head). my dear General: Yours of the 13th, by Major Anderson, is just received. I congratulate you on your splendid success, and shall very soon expect ning, and will probably write you his own views. I do not learn from your letter, or from Major Anderson, that you are in want of any thing which we have not provided at Hilton Head. Thinking it p
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
f security; all the heavy coast-guns will be dismounted and carried to Fort Pulaski. 4. The troops, for the present, will be grouped about the city of Savannah, looking to convenience of camps; General Slocum taking from the Savannah River around to the seven-mile post on the canal, and General Howard thence to the sea; General Kilpatrick will hold King's Bridge until Fort McAllister is dismantled, and the troops withdrawn from the south side of the Ogeechee, when he will take post about Anderson's plantation, on the plank-road, and picket all the roads leading from the north and west. 5. General Howard will keep a small guard at Forts Rosedale, Beaulieu, Wimberley, Thunderbolt, and Bonaventura, and he will cause that shore and Skidaway Island to be examined very closely, with a view to finding many and convenient points for the embarkation of troops and wagons on seagoing vessels. By order of Major-General W. T. Sherman, L. M. Dayton, Aide-de-Camp. [special field order no
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
hould have been so treated by the brutes into whose hands they fell, adds even to the bitterness of death. I am now awaiting the hour when I can pay my last duties to his memory. With my best and sincere wishes, my dear general, for your success and happiness, I am, most truly, your friend, J. A. Dahlgren. [General Order No. 50.] War Department Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 27, 1865. Ordered--1. That at the hour of noon, on the 14th day of April, 1865, Brevet Major-General Anderson will raise and plant upon the ruins of Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, the same United States flag which floated over the battlements of that fort during the rebel assault, and which was lowered and saluted by him and the small force of his command when the works were evacuated on the 14th day of April, 1861. 2. That the flag, when raised, be saluted by one hundred guns from Fort Sumter, and by a national salute from every fort and rebel battery that fired upon Fort Sumter.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix A. (search)
Henry Turner, Wm. L. Turner, James R. Webster, John W. Wills, James A. Wills. Company C, First Lieut. Charles W. Hodges commanding. Killed— First Sergt. Robert H. Cushing; Privates Daniel Duval, Michael Davis, Jeremiah Dulaney, Bernard Kenney, Benj. L. Lanham, James McWilliams, John T. O'Byrn, Benjamin Payne. Wounded—Second Lieut. Joseph W. Barber, mortally, Second Lieut. Thomas H. Tolson, Sergt. George Probest, Corp. Beall D. Hamilton, mortally, Corp. James A. Lawson, mortally; Privates Samuel Anderson, mortally, Robert H. Clough, Tobias Duvall, Thomas Edgar, mortally, Samuel H. Hamilton, Edgar Hammond, mortally, Charles Hammond, John McGenna, W. V. McCann, James Nash, mortally, Wm. L. Nicholas, mortally, Frank K. Steele, Wm. K. Skinner, Wm. A. Shipley, John G. White. Captured-Corp. Edward A. Welch; Privates Robert M. Dawson, Walter Mullikin, Francis E. Storm, Justus Schultz. Company D, Capt. Joseph L. McAleer commanding. Killed—Privates James A. Brown, Cornelius Kerns. Wound<
Federal fortified camp on Cheat mountain. Colonel Rust on a scouting expedition-had discovered a mountain pass, by which he could lead infantry into the rear of the Federal position. He was ordered to lead his regiment to this point, and Gen. Samuel Anderson was directed to support him with two regiments from Loring's command. Henry R. Jackson was to advance with his brigade from the camp at Greenbrier river, and Loring was to advance from Hunterville by the main road upon the Federal position. The troops reached the places assigned with remarkable promptness and at the time appointed. Colonel Rust's attack was to be the signal for the advance of all the troops. That officer, hearing nothing of Anderson, though he was in supporting distance, failed to attack. As the only hope of success was in a surprise, and as that intention had been thwarted, the troops were withdrawn to their original position. On the 3d of October, Gen. J. J. Reynolds marched down from Cheat mountain and a
right of secession. Our people did not want to meddle with the Northern States-- only wanted the latter to let them alone. When did Virginia ever ask the assistance of the General Government? If there is sin in our institutions, we bear the blame — and will stand acquitted by natural law, and the higher law of the Creator.--We stand upon the law of God and Nature. --The Southern States did not wish a resort to arms after secession. Mr. Stephens alluded to the negotiations between Maj. Anderson and the authorities of the Confederate States, to demonstrate the proposition. History, he said, if rightly written, would acquit us of a desire to shed our brothers' blood. The law of necessity and of right compelled us to act as we did. He had reason to believe that the Creator smiled on it. The Federal flag was taken down without the loss of a single life. He believed that Providence would be with us and bless us to the end. We had appealed to the God of Battles for the justnes
rvice of the United States and taken up that of his native State. He was in nearly all the battles of the Mexican war, and distingushed himself in all. Another again! "What? will the line stretch out to the crack of doom?" Major Samuel Anderson has resigned and takes service under his native State. Major Anderson is a native of Buckingham county, in this State. He is a most gallant officer, worthy to rank with the bravest in our service. He was in most of the Mexican battles,State. He was in nearly all the battles of the Mexican war, and distingushed himself in all. Another again! "What? will the line stretch out to the crack of doom?" Major Samuel Anderson has resigned and takes service under his native State. Major Anderson is a native of Buckingham county, in this State. He is a most gallant officer, worthy to rank with the bravest in our service. He was in most of the Mexican battles, and received two brevets for gallantry and good conduct.
The Daily Dispatch: May 14, 1861., [Electronic resource], English Opinions on the Fort Sumter affair. (search)
where. If there were any doubt as to the soundness of this conclusion on strategical grounds, it would be removed by the event. From the character which Major Anderson holds, and from the manner in which his duties in the earlier part of this unhappy struggle were performed, there is no reason to question his being a man of ult on the fort were spared. As soon as its walls had received a certain amount of damage, the effect of the firing of the wooden structures within the work, Major Anderson struck his flag, like a sensible soldier, and was conveyed with his men to Charleston, where they had doubtless had the most hospitable reception, and the beson is most dangerous, as the accounts of the frantic excitement in Washington on the arrival of the news of the collision at Fort Sumter, and the surrender of Major Anderson, sufficiently prove. Under these grave circumstances it is that Mr. Gregory proposes to ask the House of Commons on Tuesday next to affirm the expediency
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