Your search returned 211 results in 55 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
time taking about a dozen head of horses. All the gentlemen abducted were quiet, unoffending citizens, belonging to no military organization in the Confederate service. Their only crime was that they were secessionists. John L. Smith is a clerk, and master of the Chancery Court at Huntsville, at least seventy years of age, and is respected by all who know him in the very highest degree, and the others abducted are equally esteemed. The party from whom we derived this information, Mr. William Anderson, was likewise captured by the marauders, but made his escape. He says he could not ascertain the precise number of the enemy. He saw about forty or fifty, but they represented their number at several hundred. They were piloted in by the somewhat notorious John H. Smith, who was released by the Confederate Court at Nashville, some time ago, upon his taking the oath of allegiance, and who forfeited his recognizance some days ago in the Confederate Court at this place, upon a charge o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
on (w); Major-General Gustavus W. Smith; General Robert E. Lee. right wing, Major-General James Longstreet. Longstreet's division, Brig.-Gen. Richard H. Anderson (temporarily). Kemper's Brigade, Col. James L. Kemper: 1st Va.; 7th Va.; 11th Va.; 17th Va., Col. M. D. Corse. Anderson's (R. H.) Brigade, Col. Micah Jenkins: 5th S. C., Col. J. R. R. Giles (k), Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton (w and c), Lieut.-Col. J. M. Steedman; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Maj. William Anderson; Va. Battery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling. Pickett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. N. Berkeley; 18th Va., Col. R. E. Withers; 19th Va., Col. John B. Strange; 28th Va., Col. William Watts; Va. Battery, Capt. James Dearing. Brigade loss: k and w, 350. Wilcox's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Cadmus M. Wilcox: 9th Ala., Lieut.-Col. Stephen F. Hale; 10th Ala., Maj. J. J. Woodward; 11th Ala., Col. Sydenham Moore (m w); 19th Miss., Maj. John Mullins. Brigade loss: k and w
pened with round-shot and shell. The One Hundred and Twenty-third Illinois had been previously brought on the field, forming our extreme left, in a parallel line. Soon after the battery was in position, the One Hundred and Fifth Ohio, Col. Hall, came up, and took position on the rear and left of the battery, and the Eightieth Illinois, Col. Allen, through misdirection of the guide, came up later, and formed in the valley near the edge of the woods, as will be seen by the report of Captain William Anderson, A. A.G., herewith submitted. This battery had fired but a few shots, when we heard rifle-practice below in the woods, where the enemy soon advanced and were in sight on the edge of the woods fronting our troops. No sooner was this seen by Gen. Terrell and Lieut. Parsons, then directing the fire of the guns, than they changed the direction of the fire, and opened at short-range (about ninety yards) on the flank of the enemy with grape, with deadly accuracy. It checked the advan
the two latter wounded; Captain Fields, commanding Eleventh Alabama, Captain King, commanding Ninth Alabama, both wounded; Captain Otey, commanding Eleventh Virginia, and Captain Kilpatrick, of the Palmetto Sharp-shooters. The country and the service mourns the loss of Lieutenant-Colonel J. G. Taylor, of the Second Mississippi battalion ; Lieutenant-Colonel D. W. Baine, commanding Fourteenth Alabama regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel J. V. Scott, commanding Third Virginia regiment, and Major William Anderson, of the Palmetto Sharp-shooters. These brave and valuable officers fell at the head of their commands, in a desperate charge on the enemy's batteries. Majors Sorrel, Manning, Fairfax, and Walton, Captain Goree, and Lieutenant Blackwell, of my personal staff, displayed their usual gallantry and alacrity. After five days of night and day work, they kept up with undiminished zeal and energy. My volunteer aid, General Wigfall, remained with me also, conspicuous for his courage, coo
eavily upon the position we occupied, when we were ordered to withdraw. The following is a list of the casualties during the engagement: Major G. L. Alexander, mortally wounded in the left breast by a Minnie ball — died shortly after. In Company A, wounded--private W. B. Moore, seriously; privates A. J. Allen, A. M. Cannon, J. P. Wilson, slightly. Company C, wounded--private W. T. Harbin, slightly. Company D--Captain Randall, slightly wounded; T. J. Lovell, mortally Company E--private William Anderson, mortally wounded, since died. Company G, killed--private J. K. P. Jenkins; wounded, privates H. McCoy and William McBrown, severely; corporals A. T. Hannah and T. R. Moon, mortally. Recapitulation. Killed3 Wounded22   Total25 I take pleasure in calling your attention to the gallant and enthusiastic conduct of private John Thompson, Company F, and J. M. Byrd, Company G, who boldly moved in advance of the command and discharged their arms with due caution and alacrity
particle of which was being changed from moment to moment. Some boats visited us, notwithstanding the gale, and brought us off some of the delightful grapes and figs of the Cape. We were in the midst of the fruit season. Our old friend, Mr. William Anderson, of the firm of Anderson, Saxon & Co., who had acted as our agent, on the occasion of our former visit, so much to our satisfaction, also came off to arrange for further supplies. There was no occasion any longer for him to draw upon our Anderson, Saxon & Co., who had acted as our agent, on the occasion of our former visit, so much to our satisfaction, also came off to arrange for further supplies. There was no occasion any longer for him to draw upon our public chest, the proceeds of the merchandise shipped by him to Europe, on our account, being sufficient to pay all bills. The gale having moderated the next day, lighters came alongside, and we began coaling, and receiving such supplies of provisions as we needed. Visitors again thronged on board, and the energies and address of Bartelli were freshly taxed. For a phlegmatic, impassible people, the English are, perhaps, the greatest sight-seekers in the world; and the Cape of Good Hope, be
13th, 1864. Genl. J. B. Hood, Comdg. Army of Tenn., etc.: General,—General Beauregard, upon arriving here, found there was no post commandant or other officers on duty here; he therefore has ordered the following named wounded and invalid officers on temporary duty until other arrangements can be made: Colonel W. H. Forney, 10th Alabama, of General Lee's army, as commandant of the post; Captain Edward Hall, A. A. G., of Taylor's brigade, Army of Tennessee, as post adjutant;; Lieutenant William Anderson, acting commissary, 57th Georgia regiment, Mercer's brigade, Cleburne's division, Army of Tennessee, as acting commissary; Assistant-Surgeon R. B. Harris, 57th Georgia regiment, Mercer's brigade, Cleburne's division, Army of Tennessee, as post surgeon. There is neither a quartermaster nor commissary regularly stationed here, and both are much needed. Colonel Forney is sending forward the men as fast as they arrive. Those without shoes he has detained to act as guards until
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 18: the battle of Antietam. (search)
igadier General Mansfield, killed: Major Generals Hooker and Richardson, and Brigadier Generals Rodman, Sedgwick, Harts uff, Dana and Meagher wounded, with 12,469 killed, wounded and missing. The Confederate cause lost Brigadier Generals Branch, Anderson and Stark, killed; Major General Anderson and Brigadier Generals Toombs, Lawton, Ripley, Rodes, Gregg, Armstead and Ransom, wounded, with 25,899 killed, wounded and missing. Thirteen guns, thirty-nine colors, upwards of 15,000 stand of smallMajor General Anderson and Brigadier Generals Toombs, Lawton, Ripley, Rodes, Gregg, Armstead and Ransom, wounded, with 25,899 killed, wounded and missing. Thirteen guns, thirty-nine colors, upwards of 15,000 stand of small arms, and more than 6,00C prisoners, were the trophies of the Army of the Potomac from the battles of South Mountain, Crampton's Gap and Antietam, while not a single gun or color was lost during these battles. Official list of casualties in the Nineteenth Massachusetts regiment at the battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862. killed in action or died of wounds: Co. C.Captain George W. Bachelder. Co. B.Private John L. Foss. Private Joseph H. Pearson. Co. D.Corporal Clarence I. Tucker.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 22: crossing the river at Fredericksburg. (search)
igan and, as the rest of his regiment dashed up the bank, he was seen coming from a house with two tall Rebs at the point of his bayonet and he proudly marched them to the rear as prisoners. Many of the other men captured rebels as they ran from the houses and the pontoons as they returned took more than a hundred of these fellows. The city was held by Gen. Barksdale's Brigade, consisting of the 13th, 17th, 18th and 21st Mississippi regiments, with the 8th Florida and the 3rd Georgia of Anderson's Division. The men of the Nineteenth were by no means novices in hard fighting on the open field or in the woods and dense underbrush, but attacking an entire brigade with only a thin line of skirmishers for a distance of half a mile, concealed as they were in the attics, chambers and cellars of the houses, was not only novel but a great strain upon the moral and physical courage. The most dangerous and trying part of the action was that the enemy could fire a volley at such close range
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 39: capture of the regiment. (search)
William Farnham. Charles Dean. These 67 recruits had been forwarded to the regiment only the day before and were captured with the others. Co. A.Robert Boyd. Herman Weitzler. Robert A. Johnston. Bernard Van Ammon. Solomon Salter. Doffles Goarout. Carl Rummelsburg. Co. B.Joseph Richardson. William Doyle. Henry M. Allen. Charles Edwards. M. Sweeney. John McKane. John Scott. Co. C.Charles Belcher, Jr. Richard Meagher. Conrad Wilson. George Johnson. George Kent. William Anderson. Charles Sherman. Lewis Mortimer. Co. D.John Berden. David Spence. Thomas Lavey. George Barry. Frank Farren. Co. E.Patrick Flinn. Robert McAllen. James Smithers. Delos Gilbert. Thomas H. Collins. Stephen Hogan. Patrick Conway. Daniel Hoyt. Co. F.Nathan H. Roberts. George Dennett. Edward Haskins. William Haney. James McMahon. John Deansfield. Alexander Goodhue. William Dittmer. Co. G.August Weilmar. James Power. John Bryan. Joseph Reichardt. Joseph Robinso
1 2 3 4 5 6