hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for G. E. Anderson or search for G. E. Anderson in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
rgeon, J. S. Kitchen; Assistant-Paymaster, J. P. Woodbury; Ensigns, Marston Niles, P. W. Lowry, J. D. Clark and J. B. Coghlan; Acting-Master's Mates. D. C. Harrington, O. G. Moore, E. N. R. Place and Charles Pease, Engineers: Acting-Chief, John Yates; Acting-First-Assistant, Wm. Tipton; Acting-Second-Assistants, J. S. G. Aspinwall and E. A. Bushnell; Acting-Third-Assistants, G. E. Savory, John Moquon, Leonard Pratt and E. B. Dyer; Boatswain, John Bates; Gunner, Andrew Wilson; Carpenter, G. E. Anderson. Steamer Michigan. Commander, John C. Carter; Paymaster, C. C. Jackson; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, Win. Baas, Bennet Jones and Robert Reilly. Steamer Wachusett. Commander, Napoleon Collins; Lieutenant-Commander, L. A. Beardslee; Surgeon, Wm. M. King; Assistant-Paymaster, W. W. Williams; Acting-Master, J. H. Stimpson; Ensign, E. M. Shepard; Acting-Ensigns, Nicol Ludlow and C. J. Barclay: Acting-Master's Mates, C. R. Haskins, Reuben Rich and John Hetherington; Engineer
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
quadron, January, 1864. On the 26th of October, 1863, General Gillmore opened fire upon Fort Sumter from his battery on Morris Island, his object being to complete the reduction of this work, drive out the garrison, and occupy it with Union troops. This, as a matter of sentiment, might have been a good move; but, as the Confederates still commanded Fort Sumter with the guns of Fort Moultrie and other batteries, they could have rendered the place untenable, as they did in the time of Colonel Anderson. But the Navy was desirous of performing its share in this useless operation, and the Monitors Lehigh and Patapsco were ordered to take positions at a distance of from 1,600 to 2,000 yards of the fort, and open fire upon it with their rifled guns. These vessels were within range of Fort Moultrie for some time, but suffered little damage, while their rifle projectiles told on the walls of Fort Sumter with considerable effect. Large masses of masonry were displaced, heavy timbers t