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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 3 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. P. Anderson or search for J. P. Anderson in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

rights. South Carolina has violently and most illegally, and, as loyalty says, traitorously, seized upon fortresses, the admitted property of the United States, bought and constructed with their money, and for their protection, and with her consent, and now threatens to seize the rest. But one other, Fort Sumter, is left. It stands protected by the national flag, and its defence, and the honor of the Nation, are, thank God, in the keeping of a faithful and gallant soldier. The name of Anderson already enjoys an anticipated immortality. Is that fortress to be surrendered? Is he to be abandoned? Forbid it, patriotism! Is that flag that now floats so proudly over him and his command — the pledge of his country's confidence, support, and power, to succumb to the demands of an ungrateful, revolting State, or to be conquered by its superior accidental power? I say, no, no — a thousand times no. The fortress must at all hazards be defended — the power of the National Standard prese<
om S. C. 4. John B. Floyd, Va., U. S. Sec. of War. 5. Ben. McCullough, Texas, Maj. Texas Rangers. 6. Wm. H. T. Walker, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Inft. U. S. A. 7. Henry A. Wise, Va., late Gov. of Va. 8. H. R. Jackson, Ga., late Minister to Austria. 9. Barnard E. Bee, S. C., Capt. Inft. U. S. A. 10. Nathan G. Evans, S. C., Major Inft. U. S. A. 11. John B. Magruder,, Va., Major Art. U. S. A. 12. Wm. J. Hardee, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Cav. U. S. A. 13. Benj. Huger, S. C., Major Ordnance U. S. A. 14. Robert S. Garnett, Va., Major Inft. U. S. A. There have been other appointments made, but they are not yet known outside of the War Office. Gens. Fauntleroy, Winder, Cocke, Ruggles, and Holmes are in the Provisional Army of Virginia. Gens. Theophilus H. Holmes, Gwynn, and Gattin are in the Provisional Army of North Carolina. Gens. Pillow and Anderson have appointments as Major-Generals in Tennessee. Major-General Jere. Clemens commands in Alabama.--Richmond Whig, July 12.
s. The Tredegar Works at Richmond are very busily engaged manufacturing arms for the rebel army. They turn out two sixty-eight pounders and two six-pound howitzers, or smooth-bore cannon, and a great quantity of shot and shell every week. Mr. Anderson, who is at the head of the establishment, has formed the operatives into a military organization, called the Tredegar Battalion, of which he is the commander. The currency of Richmond is in a very disordered condition. On the best bank bilhe Potomac, had been at large on parole, in Richmond; but on Monday of last week they were again put in confinement in a tobacco warehouse on Main street, near the Rockets, where about fifty other prisoners from our army are confined. In passing through Tennessee our informant learned that General Anderson, in command of Nashville, ordered two regiments on Wednesday to East Tennessee, and two more were to go the next day, to overawe the Union men in that region.--Philadelphia. Press, July 18.
J. L. M. Curry. 4.W. P. Chilton. 5.S. F. Hale. 6.Collin S. McRae. 7.John Gill Shorter. 8.David P. Lewis. 9.Thomas Fearn. Florida. 1.Jackson Morton. 2.J. P. Anderson. 3.J. B. Owens. Georgia. 1.Robert Toombs. 2.Howell Cobb. 3.Francis S. Bartow. 4.Martin J. Crawford. 5.Eugenius A. Nisbot. 6.Benjamin H. Hill. 7.A. R.Withers, Hale, Cobb, Harris. On Naval Affairs.--Messrs. Conrad, Chesnut, Smith, Wright, Owens. On Military Affairs.--Messrs. Bartow, Miles, Sparrow, Kenan, Anderson. On Postal Affairs.--Messrs. Chilton, Boyce, Hill, Harrison, Curry. On Patents.--Messrs. Brooke, Wilson, Lewis, Hill, Kenner. On Territories.--Messrs. Chesnut, Campbell, Marshall, Nisbet, Fearn. On Public Lands.--Messrs. Marshall, Harris, Fearn, Anderson, Wright. On Indian Affairs.--Messrs. Morton, Hale, Lewis, Keitt, Sparrow. On Printing.--Messrs. T. R. R. Cobb, Harrison, Miles, Chilton, Perkins. On Accounts.--Messrs. Owens, DeClouet, Campbell, Smith, Crawford. On
tored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina;nd Castle Pinckney, and caused your little band of sixty or seventy men under the command of Major Anderson to retire to a little pen in the ocean--Fort Sumter. She commenced erecting batteries, arraey could. We also find, that on the 11th of April, General Beauregard had an interview with Major Anderson, and made a proposition to him to surrender. Major Anderson stated, in substance, that he cMajor Anderson stated, in substance, that he could do no such thing; that he could not strike the colors of his country, and refused to surrender; but he said, at the same time, that by the 15th of the month his provisions would give out, and if ar. The firing was kept up until such time as the fort was involved in smoke and flames, and Major Anderson and his men were compelled to lie on the floor with their wet handkerchiefs to their faces t