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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for James Q. Anderson or search for James Q. Anderson in all documents.

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lonel William R. Parnell. Sixth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Crocker. Ninth New York, Colonel William Sackett. Seventeenth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel James Q. Anderson. reserve brigade. Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt. Nineteenth New York (First Dragoons), Colonel Alfred Gibbs. Sixth Pennsylvania, Major James Sta a time I had fears for the safety of Wilson, but while he was preparing to move on to form his junction with Gregg and Merritt at Snell's bridge, the advance of Anderson (who was now commanding Longstreet's corps) appeared on the scene and drove him from Spottsylvania. Had Gregg and Merritt been permitted to proceed as they wsion of the Fifth Corps pushed up to the front. It got into line about 11 o'clock, and advanced to take the village, but it did not go very far before it struck Anderson's corps, and was hurled back with heavy loss. This ended all endeavor to take Spottsylvania that day. A little before noon General Meade sent for me, and wh
d of the first expedition its great success and beneficial results. The expedition which resulted in the battle of Yellow Tavern and the death of General Stuart started from the vicinity of Aldrich's toward Fredericksburg early on the morning of May 9, 1864, marching on the plank-road, Merritt's division leading. When the column reached Tabernacle Church it headed almost due east to the telegraph road, and thence down that highway to Thornburg, and from that point through Childsburg to Anderson's crossing of the North Anna River, it being my desire to put my command south of that stream if possible, where it could procure forage before it should be compelled to fight. The corps moved at a walk, the three divisions on the same road, making a column nearly thirteen miles in length, and marched around the right flank of the enemy unsuspected until my rear guard had passed Massaponax Church. Although the column was very long, I preferred to move it all on one road rather than to att