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rted.--A bill imposing taxes for the support of Government; a bill making appropriations for deficiencies in former appropriations, and for defraying expenses of the General Assembly and Convention, now in session — which were read the first time, and ordered to be read a second time; a bill for the relief of John M. Jones, late Sheriff of Pendleton county; a bill for the relief of John H. Dunlary, late Sheriff of Mathews county; a bill for the voluntary enslavement of Thomas Garland and Mary Anderson, free persons of color, of the county of Hanover. Resolutions of Inquiry.--The following resolutions of inquiry were offered and referred. By Mr. Quesenberry, of incorporating the Oxford Cotton and Woolen Manufacturing Company, in the county of Caroline; by Mr. August, of allowing Mrs. Martha Jane Eckert to marry again. Mr. McKenney called for the order of the day — the bill releasing the schooner Pauline from the payment of Commonwealth's claim to a fine imposed for an allege
s; refunding a sum of money to the heirs of Wm. A. Bradford and Peter Grant; refunding a sum of money to P. B. Crowder. Mr. Bass presented a report from a special committee authorizing the Trustees of the Parsonage of the M. E. Church in Salem, Roanoke county, to execute a deed of trust on their property in said town. The Tax Bill.--The hour having arrived for the consideration of the bill "imposing taxes for the support of Government" as the order of the day, it was taken upon motion of Mr. Haymond, and numerous amendments thereto proposed. An amendment offered by Mr. Collier, of Petersburg, exempting the salaries of laboring men from taxation was adopted. An amendment proposed by Mr. Anderson, of Botetourt, to exempt the salaries of the Judges of the Supreme Courts of Appeals and of the Circuit Courts from taxation, was lost. It was advocated by Messrs. Myers and Robertson, and opposed by Messrs. Duckwall and Yerby. On motion of Mr. Kincheloe, the House adjourned.
Dispatch from Major Anderson. --The Secretary of War received Monday evening another dispatch from Major Anderson, dated Feb. 28. He contradicts the statement that President Davis had been to Charleston. He says that the report that he had been sick is without a particle of foundation. He is in good health, as is also his little band of soldiers. Affairs in Charleston harbor are arriving at a point when further delay on their part will be impossible. Their extensive works of defence anMajor Anderson, dated Feb. 28. He contradicts the statement that President Davis had been to Charleston. He says that the report that he had been sick is without a particle of foundation. He is in good health, as is also his little band of soldiers. Affairs in Charleston harbor are arriving at a point when further delay on their part will be impossible. Their extensive works of defence and attack are nearly if not quite completed. The feeling between the authorities and himself continues to be friendly, and he is allowed all the facilities that he could expect. Fresh provisions and marketing are supplied in abundance. He experiences no difficulty in sending or receiving his mall matter.
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], The last day of the U. S. Congress. (search)
y in power. "I have been anxious to communicate the substance of a conversation held by Dr. Wirt, (my brother-in-law,) with ex-Gov. Chase, of Ohio, in Washington, on the evening of Friday, the 15th February. He called upon Chase and expressed a hope that as he would probably be in Lincoln's Cabinet, he would use his influence to preserve peace in the South, and not attempt to reinforce or retake the Southern forts; and Chase told him that the President would do his duty, and reinforce Anderson and protect him at all hazards. If South Carolina resisted, the consequences would be on her own head. Dr. Wirt told him what would be the effect of such a course on the South. All the conservative and Union-loving men of Virginia and the South would resist; secession would result, and the entire South forced into Union. He answered that could not be helped — When Dr. Wirt inquired if he ever expected the South to return to the Union after their homes had been threatened and their count
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], Creature Comports for Maj. Anderson. (search)
Creature Comports for Maj. Anderson. --Several boxes, containing creature comforts, arrived at Norfolk, Va., on the Yorktown, Monday, and were forwarded to Maj. Anderson, at Fort Sumter, per Adams' Express Co. Creature Comports for Maj. Anderson. --Several boxes, containing creature comforts, arrived at Norfolk, Va., on the Yorktown, Monday, and were forwarded to Maj. Anderson, at Fort Sumter, per Adams' Express Co.